5 investors explain why longevity tech is a long-term game – TechCrunch

Of all the stories passed down through history, the tales of endless life have persisted in the human imagination without much change. The details differ, but almost every civilization since the time of the Egyptians has in one way or another sought to delay death.

Although we are still a long way from achieving this lofty goal, science has come a long way and as life expectancy increases, longevity is now an area of ​​technology and medicine that aims to increase lifespan. in good health.

“There is a common misconception among the general public that longevity means being frail and looking old for longer (‘Curse of Tithonus’),” said Nathan Cheng and Sebastian Brunemeier of Healthspan Capital. “The goal is to slow the rate of aging, and even reverse the clock – this is already possible in animals. Longevity therapies mean we will live longer and healthier lives.


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But the cost and time involved in developing longevity solutions present a major hurdle, which means founders must be prepared to take a long-term view. “It’s very difficult to convince people to do things that only leave a visible impact in the long term. Longevity is one of those things,” said Samuel Gil, partner at JME Ventures.

“The space is just beginning and will seep into every aspect of our lives over the next five to ten years.” Samuel Gil, Partner, JME Ventures

But Gil noted that the breadth of opportunity offered by space is almost unprecedented:

There are several angles for solving problems for very heterogeneous groups with different requirements. Lifespan versus lifespan, longevity of pets versus humans, biotechnology versus wellness, seniors versus young people, dependency versus autonomy, prevention versus treatment, analytics, education, infrastructure… Almost like fintech was not just about creating from credit card startups, we’re going to see longevity APIs, back-ends, and more.

It is becoming clear that longevity as a theme has resonated with investors, although it looks like it will be some time before more generalist investors pick up on it.

To keep you up to date on the situation and developments in the longevity market, we spoke with:


Samuel Gil, Partner, JME Ventures

What’s the most important thing longevity founders need to know for the first time?

Longevity is a loaded word. Although most people are interested in longer lifespan (the number of years you live without major age-related health problems), not everyone is interested (and some have prejudice against) extending lifespan (delaying human death).

There are several reasons for this. Some think life has meaning because it’s over (who wants to live forever?). Others are thinking about environmental or economic issues.

So my advice here is to use the term “longevity” with caution or use alternatives.

As we all know, it is very difficult to convince people to do things that only leave a visible impact in the long term. Longevity is one of those things. My advice here is that your product should solve a problem for the user at the moment – help them with back pain or knee pain, look better, etc. – to entice him to buy now. Then you can use the longevity program as a way to build long-term user loyalty.

There are several angles for solving problems for very heterogeneous groups with different requirements. Lifespan versus lifespan, longevity of pets versus humans, biotechnology versus wellness, seniors versus young people, dependency versus autonomy, prevention versus treatment, analytics, education, infrastructure… Almost like fintech was not just about creating from credit card startups, we’re going to see longevity APIs, back-ends, and more.

Analysts estimate that the human death delay market could be worth $610 billion by 2025. What would unlock more growth in this industry?

Let me take the opposite view: I think the main challenge in space is that the bolder approaches and products need to be clinically tested on large samples of the population for very long periods of time. However, there are plenty of other things you can already try with a big benefit and almost no downside.

As soon as a clinical trial shows positive results in humans, it will be a gold rush.

What excites you most about longevity?

We all know how powerful technology can be in shaping behavior. I believe there is huge potential in using technology to shape positive health behaviors (sleep, exercise, nutrition) in the population. The impacts on the healthcare system can be enormous.

I also really like quantized self-movement. I find it very disgusting that we know in real time what is going on in our cars, but we have no idea what is going on inside our bodies. Continuous monitoring will become a reality at some point.

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