Eu accession – Westie Lovers http://westielovers.com/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 13:41:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://westielovers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-icon-32x32.png Eu accession – Westie Lovers http://westielovers.com/ 32 32 PM Krivokapić meets Director for Western Balkans at German Foreign Ministry https://westielovers.com/pm-krivokapic-meets-director-for-western-balkans-at-german-foreign-ministry/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 13:41:24 +0000 https://westielovers.com/pm-krivokapic-meets-director-for-western-balkans-at-german-foreign-ministry/ Prime Minister Zdravko Krivokapić today met the Director for South Eastern Europe, Turkey, EFTA States, OSCE and Council of Europe at the German Federal Foreign Ministry Susanne Schütz. Prime Minister Krivokapić said the government wants to join the European Union at an accelerated pace. EU membership is our strategic objective, on which Montenegro is constantly […]]]>

Prime Minister Zdravko Krivokapić today met the Director for South Eastern Europe, Turkey, EFTA States, OSCE and Council of Europe at the German Federal Foreign Ministry Susanne Schütz.

Prime Minister Krivokapić said the government wants to join the European Union at an accelerated pace. EU membership is our strategic objective, on which Montenegro is constantly working and investing maximum efforts, the Prime Minister stressed.

The Prime Minister thanked Director Schütz for the continued support Germany is giving Montenegro on its European path. Prime Minister Krivokapić said the government was determined to undertake rule of law reforms, stressing that the focus was on achieving concrete results in the fight against organized crime and corruption. Prime Minister Krivokapić also informed his interlocutor about the government’s reform programs, stressing that the government’s goal is to develop democracy, citizens and ecology of Montenegro through economic development.

Director Schütz said she was happy that Montenegro was the most advanced country in the EU accession negotiations. She underlined that Germany is closely following developments in all Western Balkan countries, stressing that further efforts are needed to accelerate its progress on the EU path.

We want Montenegro to stay on the Euro-Atlantic path, and we hope that it will progress quickly, because it is important, both for your country and for the region, said Schütz.

Officials agreed that the Berlin process is of exceptional importance for the countries of the Western Balkans and has an irreplaceable role in strengthening regional cooperation and connecting countries in the region with the EU.


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Nothing calm on the Eastern Front – EURACTIV.com https://westielovers.com/nothing-calm-on-the-eastern-front-euractiv-com/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 09:14:02 +0000 https://westielovers.com/nothing-calm-on-the-eastern-front-euractiv-com/ Welcome to EURACTIV’s Global Europe Brief, your weekly update on the EU from a global perspective. You can sign up to receive our newsletter here. In this week’s edition: Belarus-Ukraine fears, Dushanbe talks and blocking of EU membership. Russia appears to be living up to its old tricks, and events in and around Belarus have […]]]>

Welcome to EURACTIV’s Global Europe Brief, your weekly update on the EU from a global perspective.

You can sign up to receive our newsletter here.

In this week’s edition: Belarus-Ukraine fears, Dushanbe talks and blocking of EU membership.

Russia appears to be living up to its old tricks, and events in and around Belarus have become closely linked to the security situation in Ukraine.

Suddenly the strange article, published by Russian President Vladimir Putin on the Kremlin government’s website in early July this year, makes sense (as it already did then to many suspicious Eastern Europeans of Moscow’s intentions).

“Russians, Ukrainians and Belarusians are the heirs of old Russia, which was the largest state in Europe,” Putin wrote, stressing “the historical unity of Russians and Ukrainians”.

NATO members and the Kiev government accused Moscow of fueling tensions in those same countries, now independent states, by deploying large numbers of troops to the border.

In March, Russia rounded up thousands of soldiers, armored equipment, warships and air force devices near the Ukrainian border and near the annexed Crimean peninsula in a massive effort military.

The situation has intensified in recent weeks, causing many in the West and the East to fear the worst.

Moscow seems to believe that the EU, US and NATO would not step in to protect Ukraine. As a non-member of the EU and NATO, the options are indeed limited but not non-existent.

Just before the meeting of NATO foreign ministers in Riga, likely to focus prominently on Russia-Ukraine-Belarus, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg warned Russia that there would have “costs and consequences”, marking an intensification of the tone of the alliance.

“There is no certainty about Russia’s intentions, but what we do know is that they have already used military force against Ukraine,” Stoltenberg told EURACTIV, when asked about concerns that the Kremlin could use the Belarusian border crisis as a smokescreen to prepare for military action against the country.

→ More in our exclusive interview Monday at 7:30 am CET!

“Russia will run like a red thread throughout the meeting, and let’s be honest, all other things must be left aside in light of the situation we are facing,” a NATO diplomat told EURACTIV .

The meeting will include sessions including talks on US-Russian arms control and strategic stability, joint discussions with Ukraine and Georgia, and a session on the Western Balkans, with Finland, Sweden and the diplomat in head of the EU, non-NATO, Josep Borrell.

“We can expect that, especially in the talks between Georgia and Ukraine and the Western Balkans, Russia will occupy an important place, you cannot separate that, and we should not have the illusion that we can, ”said another NATO diplomat.

The problem with trying to defuse the tensions right now is that no official channel is available. Since Russia closed its NATO mission and ignored NATO’s call to come to the negotiating table in the NATO-Russia Council, it was referred to contacts outside the structured dialogue.

At the same time, it is interesting to note that there is greater EU-NATO coordination on the issue.

In a joint visit, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg will visit Lithuania and Latvia on Sunday.

EU member states are currently divided between those who want a firm stand and potentially more sanctions and those, especially Hungary, who want a softer approach and cooperation with Russia.

But according to EU diplomats, a response with potential additional sanctions against Russia seems unlikely to come soon.


DIGEST EURASIA

SPEECH FROM DOUHANBE | EU Chief Diplomat Josep Borrell and Commissioner for International Partnerships Jutta Urpilainen called on Afghanistan’s neighbors to prevent human trafficking to Belarus, an initiative they say has been “successful. ” In the region.

In Dushanbe, the high-level EU delegation attended an EU-Central Asia meeting with its counterparts, where the situation in and around Afghanistan was high on the agenda, security and migration dominating the concerns of the bloc vis-à-vis the region.

EU-KAZAKHSTAN | Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev paid a rare official visit to Belgium on Thursday and Friday in order to present his country as a reliable partner of the EU and open the door to new opportunities.

THE EU IN THE WORLD

ETHIOPIA COLLAPSES? | As European governments urge their citizens to leave Ethiopia and essential diplomatic personnel are expelled, the EU is increasingly concerned that the escalation of civil conflict in that country threatens to undo the country entirely. .

DEFENSE CORNER

NUCLEAR SHARING | Germany will remain a party to the NATO nuclear sharing deal under its new government, according to a coalition agreement reached this week, a move that will prevent a breakdown in the Western military alliance at a time of growing tensions with the United States. Russia.

SEA BOTTOM AMMUNITION | Tons of dangerous chemical and conventional munitions were dumped in European seas after the end of the world wars of the last century, and today they pose a risk to marine life and sailors.

The intensification of economic activities on the high seas increases the risk of damage from munitions and chemical weapons dumped in European seas during the first and second world wars, said EU environment commissioner Virginijus Sinkevičius.

LAST ENLARGEMENT

ACT WITH CARE? | Partly attributing his party’s crushing defeat in the recent municipal elections to the stalling of EU membership negotiations, North Macedonian Justice Minister Bojan Marichikj told EURACTIV that the Skopje government would be more cautious in l ‘to come up.

BOSNIA CHILDREN | Enlargement Commissioner Olivér Várhelyi visited Bosnia and Herzegovina this week in an attempt to defuse the current political crisis in the country which is again cracks along ethnic lines after a bloody war of 1992-95.

ASYLUM SEEKERS | More than 1,400 Albanians applied for asylum in EU member states in August 2021, an increase of 46% from July and more than double that of June, returning to a pre-pandemic trend, according to the reports. EU data. This is because reducing unfounded asylum cases is one of the conditions for EU membership that the Commission claims Albania has fulfilled.


WHAT ELSE WE READ

ON OUR RADAR FOR THE NEXT DAYS…

We will keep you up to date with all relevant EU foreign affairs news, as Europe prepares for a busy end to the year. Here’s what’s coming next week:

  • Visit of NATO Secretary General Stoltenberg and European Commission President von der Leyen
    | Sunday 28 November 2021 | Latvia, Lithuania
  • Iran nuclear negotiations set to resume
    | Monday, November 29, 2021 | Vienna, Austria
  • US-Taliban talks set to resume
    | Monday, November 29, 2021 | Doha, qatar
  • Meeting of Foreign Ministers of the Union for the Mediterranean
    | Monday, November 29, 2021 | Barcelona, ​​Spain
  • European Parliament’s SEDE Committee meets to discuss strategic compass with Commissioner Breton
    | Monday, November 29, 2021 | Brussels, Belgium
  • Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons holds annual meeting of member states
    | Monday, November 29, 2021 | The Hague, Netherlands
  • Court holds hearing on closing Memorial Human Rights Center
    | Monday, November 29, 2021 | Moscow, Russia
  • NATO foreign ministers meet on Russia, Belarus and strategic concept
    | Tue-Wed, 30-1 December 2021 | Riga, Latvia
  • European Commission presents the EU’s Global Gateway initiative / Revision of the Schengen Borders Code
    | Wednesday, December 1, 2021 | Brussels, Belgium
  • European Parliament AFET Committee meets on Ethiopia, Azerbaijan and Armenia
    | Wed-Thu, December 1-2, 2021 | Brussels, Belgium
  • EU-Western Balkans Ministerial Forum on Justice and Home Affairs
    | Wed-Fri, 1-3 December 2021 | Brdo, Slovenia
  • Russia and ASEAN hold first-ever joint naval exercises
    | Wednesday, December 1, 2021 | Medan, Indonesia
  • OSCE Ministerial Council
    | Thursday, December 2, 2021 | Stockholm, Sweden

Thanks for reading!
If you want to contact us with any leaks, tips or comments, drop us a line.

Like what you see? Sign up for the full newsletter here, for free!


PAST EDITIONS


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Positioning apparel supply chains for success in the new era of Brexit https://westielovers.com/positioning-apparel-supply-chains-for-success-in-the-new-era-of-brexit/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 12:55:03 +0000 https://westielovers.com/positioning-apparel-supply-chains-for-success-in-the-new-era-of-brexit/ The thematic report entitled ‘The impact of Brexit on clothing ‘ describes the effects of the UK’s agreement on the terms of its departure from the EU bloc in December 2020 on the clothing industry. He says there has been a colossal impact on apparel supply chains, with UK-based retailers that have multi-country supply chains […]]]>

The thematic report entitled ‘The impact of Brexit on clothing ‘ describes the effects of the UK’s agreement on the terms of its departure from the EU bloc in December 2020 on the clothing industry.

He says there has been a colossal impact on apparel supply chains, with UK-based retailers that have multi-country supply chains being more affected by Brexit than those with ” simpler UK specific supply chains “.

The challenges include trade tariffs, movement of goods, changes in the labor market, and general implications for consumer attitudes and purchasing behavior in the region.

Despite this, there are opportunities for retailers in the UK, according to the report, and areas such as mergers and acquisitions and potential new trade deals should be explored.

Potential mergers and acquisitions (M&A)

Clothing retailers can use mergers and acquisitions as a means of securing their established presence in EU markets, while also using them as a method to speed up market access outside the EU.

New trade agreements

Brexit has allowed the UK to explore new trade avenues, as it is now free to sign trade deals with countries outside the EU and find new supply partners who can supply goods to lower cost. For example, in September 2020, the United Kingdom announced a new Free Trade Agreement with Japan (CEPA United Kingdom-Japan), which, in addition to allowing the free movement of goods, proclaims itself to be a important stepping stone towards UK membership of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

In February 2021, the UK government announced that it had formally applied to join the CPTPP, and the membership process finally began on June 2, 2021. One of the UK’s top priorities is to launch trade negotiations with the United States, Australia and New Zealand, indicating its interest in further integration into the American-Asian bloc.

On June 15, 2021, the UK government announced it had reached a trade deal with Australia – although the final deal has yet to be signed and implemented.

On the US-UK front, although some smaller deals have already been signed, a comprehensive trade deal between the US and UK is still ongoing, as is the case with New Zealand.

The UK has also had to clarify its trade relations with the EU – its most important and closest trading partner. After months of negotiations, the two sides finally agreed to a UK-EU trade deal that entered into force on May 1, 2021. The deal prevents the introduction of additional tariffs and quotas and therefore helps protect retailers against increased trading costs.

Tax-free purchases

Brexit has benefited duty-free retailers across the UK and the EU from January 2021, passengers traveling from the UK to the EU can make duty-free purchases, aligning the duty-free approach of the UK to the EU over the rest of the world.

At the same time, the declining value of the British pound means that passengers traveling to the UK will find it cheaper to shop in the country. However, retailers will not be able to take full advantage of these benefits until all international travel restrictions related to Covid-19 are lifted.

On the other hand, with the aim of aligning its systems of duties and taxes with international practices, the British Treasury announced its decision to end two programs which allow tourists to make their purchases without VAT in September 2020. Previously, all non-EU visitors traveling to the UK were eligible to reclaim the 20% VAT paid on purchases such as clothing and jewelry, which encouraged travelers to shop in the UK. According to Condor Ferries, in July 2019 alone (before the Covid-19-induced travel restrictions were present), international tourists spent more than 2.9 billion euros ($ 3.3 billion) during their summer vacation in the UK.

The UK government’s decision to end VAT-free shopping will impact UK-based luxury retailers such as Burberry and Harrods in particular. In response to the Treasury ruling, Burberry CFO and COO Julie Brown said the retailer would lose its “home court advantage” and be more exposed to competition from other luxury retailers in Paris and Milan. Retailers such as Selfridges, Chanel and Burberry have also warned the UK government that cutting VAT relief for tourists could result in a loss of investment of around £ 1bn ($ 1.3bn ).

Maximize Brexit Opportunities

UK-based apparel retailers should take advantage of the uncertainty surrounding Brexit and Covid-19 to rethink their supply chain strategies and operations, with the aim of increasing the flexibility of their investment plan and of transition.

Before Brexit, UK-based clothing retailers and manufacturers relied on borderless free market access to operate their businesses across Europe. Germany, the Republic of Ireland and France are the UK’s main textile and clothing export markets, according to World Bank and World Trade Organization estimates. The UK needs to ensure that the country’s stakeholders remain competitive in the wider market.

According to the rules set out by the HMRC in Chapter 62, as of December 2020, in order for any garment and clothing accessory (not knitted or crocheted) to obtain “country of origin” status, they must undergo a tailoring (such as cutting. and sewing) preceded by printing accompanied by at least two preparatory finishing operations (such as pickling and bleaching), if the materials used for manufacture come from developed countries. This follows WTO rules on “double processing” to ensure change of origin.

For items imported from Least Developed Countries (LDCs), “manufacture from fabrics”, also known as “one-off processing”, is permitted. This will help clothing retailers source seamlessly from key locations such as Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Vietnam and Sri Lanka. Countries like Bangladesh and Cambodia expect continued preferential treatment on zero or low tariffs for textile exports. The United Kingdom-Vietnam Free Trade Agreement (UKVFTA), implemented on May 1, 2021, removes tariffs on imports from Vietnam. Likewise, India is considering better terms for trade with the UK as it is in talks to sign a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) that gives it the ability to negotiate lower tariffs and volumes. higher.

Brexit has led clothing retailers to consider moving operations from EU countries to outside the UK to avoid new taxes and tariffs. This includes obtaining a new business address, opening warehouses and distribution centers, and changing routes for supply chains.

ASOS anticipated the difficulties and opened a warehouse in Berlin in 2019 as part of its international expansion strategy to serve customers across Europe. British sports brand Gymshark envisions international growth by adding distribution centers across Europe to provide uninterrupted services amid Brexit-related disruptions. In February 2020, it opened a warehouse in Belgium in partnership with the logistics company Bleckmann.

Small retailers are also making changes. However, they often do not have the capital, capacity or, in many cases, a customer base large enough to justify building a full warehouse in foreign countries and therefore face more difficulties. In addition, they may have difficulty finding qualified people to advise them on export requirements under new tariffs and VAT regimes. Partnerships with established logistics and warehousing companies that could handle supply chain operations are a viable solution for small and medium businesses.

The next steps

  • Review procurement strategies: Retailers need to explore new onshore supplier bases and local channels to ensure reliable and profitable supply chains. By doing so, retailers can also avoid short-term risks resulting from fluctuations in currencies and commodity prices.
  • Review the imprint: Retailers need to optimize their manufacturing and logistics footprints, reassess the scope and timing of investments, reallocate production for business benefit, and invest in digital technologies and advanced analytics tools. This will allow them to use the data to make informed decisions based on contemporary market dynamics.
  • Inventory management: In the short term, retailers need to adapt their inventory management methods to maintain safety stocks and ensure business continuity during these market uncertainties. In the medium to long term, retailers will need to reassess their safety stock levels as they create new operating conditions to meet their dynamic needs.
  • Demand forecast: Retailers need to align their forecasting capabilities to forecast and manage the impact of changes in demand on their inventory levels. They should emphasize flexibility to cope with fluctuations in demand by adopting strategies such as outsourcing.
  • Align the product portfolio: Some retailers will also need to prepare to adjust their R&D strategies to handle changes in product specifications. Changes can be triggered by regulatory changes related to Brexit or by changing consumer demands.

Click here for the full report.

An earlier report assessing the sector between 2020 and 2025 indicates that Brexit, Covid-19 and an aging population will continue to challenge the growth of the UK apparel sector over the next year, with the tightening of the purse strings across the population and the focus away from non-essential spending.


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Bosnia’s EU enlargement leader works to prevent crisis from spilling over – EURACTIV.com https://westielovers.com/bosnias-eu-enlargement-leader-works-to-prevent-crisis-from-spilling-over-euractiv-com/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 13:41:41 +0000 https://westielovers.com/bosnias-eu-enlargement-leader-works-to-prevent-crisis-from-spilling-over-euractiv-com/ EU Enlargement Commissioner Olivér Várhelyi travels to Bosnia and Herzegovina on Wednesday and Thursday (24-25 November) to try to defuse the current political crisis in the country which is cracking again along ethnic lines after a bloody war from 1992-95. Asked by EURACTIV whether tangible results are expected from the visit, a European Commission spokesperson […]]]>

EU Enlargement Commissioner Olivér Várhelyi travels to Bosnia and Herzegovina on Wednesday and Thursday (24-25 November) to try to defuse the current political crisis in the country which is cracking again along ethnic lines after a bloody war from 1992-95.

Asked by EURACTIV whether tangible results are expected from the visit, a European Commission spokesperson said they “cannot prejudge discussions”.

The divided country crisis escalated last summer when the leaders of Republika Srpska, one of the two entities of post-war Bosnia, announced a boycott of the common central institutions that have held the country together ever since. the Dayton Peace Accord in 1995.

The move was a response to outgoing international envoy Valentin Inzko’s decision on July 23 to ban denial of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, which Serbian leaders found unacceptable.

The Office of the High Representative (OHR), which is responsible for the civilian implementation of the peace agreement, has the power to impose decisions or dismiss officials.

Inzko’s successor, Christian Schmidt, has since warned of a deterioration in the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina, underscored by promises by Republika Srpska leader Milorad Dodik of secession and the creation of a separate army of the joint state forces.

High Representative of BiH Schmidt: No Army of Republika Srpska

“The army of Republika Srpska will not be trained,” Bosnia and Herzegovina High Representative Christian Schmidt said in an interview with Voice of America. The Republika Srpska (RS) is a Serbian entity in BiH.

In interviews with Schmidt, US national security adviser …

Croatian demands

The cowardly central institutions of Bosnia and Herzegovina keep the Republika Srpska in a difficult state alliance with the other entity, the Bosnian-Croat federation.

Any political solution will have to take into account the demands of the HDZ, the largest Croatian party, and of its leader, Dragan Čović, who, despite the support of the majority of Croats, is not the current member of the country’s tripartite presidency. representing Bosnians, Croats and Serbs.

The HDZ refuses to recognize the current Croatian representative, Željko Komšić, claiming that he was elected thanks to the Bosnian votes.

Čović and the HDZ are calling for an overhaul of the electoral law in order to strengthen the position of Croats in the elections in the Federation, where Bosnians represent a large majority.

The question of whether to recognize the demands of the HDZ has also divided political groups in the European Parliament.

Speaking on behalf of the European Christian-Conservative People’s Party (EPP), the greatest force in the European Parliament, MEP Andrey Kovachev said: “In order to ensure peace and stability, the three communities must be represented as fair manner ”.

“This is why changes in the electoral law are in great demand to give the Croats in Bosnia and Herzegovina the possibility of being on an equal footing in terms of representations with the other two communities,” he said. Tuesday in plenary session of Parliament in Strasbourg (23 November).

Meanwhile, the much smaller Greens have called for the phasing out of ethnicity-based logic.

“I urge the EU and the entire international community not to compromise on the democratic reforms that are so necessary and to finally move away from ethnic dividing lines,” said MEP Tineke Strik.

To sanction or not to sanction?

Slovenian Foreign Minister Anže Logar, whose country holds the rotating presidency of the Council of the EU, said that “the recent blockage of state institutions is unacceptable”.

“The political leaders of Bosnia and Herzegovina must resolve the deadlock as a matter of priority and re-focus on joint efforts to go further with reforms, which will allow the country to move forward on the path of the EU”, he told lawmakers during Tuesday’s debate. .

The EU has so far been heavily criticized for its poor response to the crisis and Washington, which largely abandoned the region after the war, seems much more keen to take an active role now.

At their meeting (15 November) in Brussels, EU foreign ministers discussed the situation in Bosnia but without tangible results.

The question of whether to slap Dodik with sanctions also divided the bloc, but only Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany and the Czech Republic supported the idea, well below the 15 EU countries needed.

On the other hand, the United States has played a more assertive role, the American special envoy for the Western Balkans, Gabriel Escobar, accusing Dodik of provoking a new crisis to “protect his power and his money”, in a recent interview with Radio Free Europe.

Dodik to the American envoy Escobar: F ** k the sanctions!

Milorad Dodik, a Serbian member of the presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina, revealed details of the meeting with US envoy to the Western Balkans, Gabriel Escobar, whom he initially said was “not for the public”. According to the transcript that Dodik revealed, he told Escobar, “the …

However, the division between EU countries over sanctions is also reflected in the European Parliament, where the EPP made no mention of sanctions in Tuesday’s debate.

The Greens, strong supporters of the sanctions, also backed by the Social Democrats and the Liberals, failed to put a resolution on the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina on the agenda for this week’s plenary session.

“The European Union cannot remain silent,” Social Democratic MP Pedro Marques said during Parliament’s debate on Bosnia.

“It must play a much stronger role with all the instruments at its disposal, including pressures and even sanctions to preserve the territorial integrity, unity and peace of Bosnia and Herzegovina,” he said. added.

Klemen Grošelj, Slovenian MEP from the liberal Renew group, echoed this: “Our Euro-Atlantic friends and the EU must act immediately, including sanctions. Sanctions should also be on the table ”.

Another way to put financial pressure on Dodik would be to cut EU financial aid to countries waiting to join the club.

However, this would require a political push from the cabinet of Commissioner Várhelyi, who in turn has been accused of favoring Serbia’s EU candidacy, Dodik’s ally, and playing down democracy problems in Belgrade.

Unlike Serbia, which is already in negotiations for EU membership, Bosnia and Herzegovina has applied but is not yet officially a candidate.

After a recent trip to Bosnia, MEP Strik told reporters that Várhelyi refused to blame Milorad Dodik for the crisis.

“He said, ‘listen, I think it’s the EU actually that’s the cause of all of this because we’re not giving any perspective and so we should be opening new ones. [negotiating] clusters for Serbia, ”said the Green MEP during her recent meeting with the Commissioner.

She added that Várhely is in fact “one of the people supporting Dodik and the Serbs”.

[Edited by Zoran Radosavljevic]


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Focus on the news: Pacific trade deal faces formidable legal hurdles | New https://westielovers.com/focus-on-the-news-pacific-trade-deal-faces-formidable-legal-hurdles-new/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 10:00:57 +0000 https://westielovers.com/focus-on-the-news-pacific-trade-deal-faces-formidable-legal-hurdles-new/ Last week was International Trade Week, created as part of the government’s efforts to convert UK businesses from a Eurocentric mindset to a global mindset. Trade Policy Minister Penny Mordaunt set the tone by announcing her enthusiasm to negotiate a comprehensive free trade agreement with the United States. An agreement would set global standards and […]]]>

Last week was International Trade Week, created as part of the government’s efforts to convert UK businesses from a Eurocentric mindset to a global mindset. Trade Policy Minister Penny Mordaunt set the tone by announcing her enthusiasm to negotiate a comprehensive free trade agreement with the United States. An agreement would set global standards and increase bilateral trade to as much as £ 15.3 billion, she said.

Acknowledging that “we know that the United States has more to do to be ready for an FTA”, she said “when they are, we will wait for them”.

However, another development last week suggests that may be bullish. A lengthy report by a Lords committee on another hoped-for trade deal lists some legal hurdles that need to be overcome along the way to Global Britain. These include conflicts in intellectual property and data protection law, and the need to go beyond the European “precautionary principle” when approving innovations.

New frameworks will also be needed to encourage mutual recognition of professional qualifications – an issue unlikely to be spelled out in the black letter of major free trade agreements.

The Lords International Agreements Committee was reviewing the negotiating positions set by the British government for joining the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), 11-country successor to the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which was killed by President Trump in 2017. The geography and political-legal culture of the members range from Australia and Canada to Mexico, Japan and Vietnam, representing 13% of global GDP. This figure would rise to 16% when the United Kingdom joins, equivalent to the EU but growing faster. Hence the UK’s interest in signing, a prospect reinforced by last month’s agreement of a trade deal with New Zealand.

However, in its investigation, the committee, chaired by Lord Goldsmith (partner of Debevoise & Plimpton and former Attorney General Peter Goldsmith QC) identifies several conflicts between the US-oriented provisions of the CPTPP and current UK law.

In intellectual property law, for example, the committee points out that the Pacific Accord is “in part built on a US approach to regulation … Membership of the CPTPP can lead to conflicts with the UK’s current regulatory regime. Uni, which will have to be dealt with in the framework of the accession negotiations. ‘.

For example, the European Patent Convention, to which the United Kingdom belongs, stipulates that an invention cannot be recognized as new if it has been made public: the CPTPP grants a grace period of 12 months in certain circumstances. The commission cites warnings from witnesses that the UK could suffer “direct economic damage” if it were to leave the EU regime, including a “dramatic” shrinkage of the UK patent profession.

The report urges the government to explain how it will reconcile its obligations under the European Convention and the provisions of the CPTPP.

Likewise on data protection, the report says that a clause in the CPTPP could conflict with the UK’s ‘data adequacy’ status with the EU, already potentially threatened by the government’s decision to develop a new data protection regime. Again, he calls for more information.

Another obvious conflict is between the European “precautionary approach” to innovations such as genetic modification and the “science-based” approach of the CPTPP. The committee asks the government “to explain how it will seek to manage these divergent regulatory approaches”.

Elsewhere, the committee finds that while the CPTPP contains useful provisions for professional services, it cites the Bar as having found that the goals of legal professionals “are unlikely to be achieved” directly by the agreement. The CPTPP simply states that each party “will encourage its relevant bodies to establish dialogues” on the subject. This “could give the UK a place at the table to improve liberalization of trade in legal services,” the company told the commission’s inquiry.

A parliamentary measure aimed at guaranteeing the freedom of regulators to establish standards for the recognition of foreign qualifications, the draft law on professional qualifications, is due to be submitted to the Commons shortly.

However, an overall note of caution from the committee is that the UK is asking to accede to an existing agreement and therefore “the extent to which it should be accepted ‘as is’ or can be amended is uncertain”. But in his speech last week, Mordaunt did not foresee any conflict. After all, she said, “free markets and democracy go hand in hand.”


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Over 1,400 Albanians applied for asylum in the EU in August 2021 – Released https://westielovers.com/over-1400-albanians-applied-for-asylum-in-the-eu-in-august-2021-released/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 09:09:51 +0000 https://westielovers.com/over-1400-albanians-applied-for-asylum-in-the-eu-in-august-2021-released/ More than 1,400 Albanians applied for asylum in EU member states in August 2021, a 46% increase from July and more than double that in June, according to EU data. The numbers were higher than in the months leading up to the pandemic, including December 2019 and January and February 2020. Of the August applications, […]]]>

More than 1,400 Albanians applied for asylum in EU member states in August 2021, a 46% increase from July and more than double that in June, according to EU data.

The numbers were higher than in the months leading up to the pandemic, including December 2019 and January and February 2020.

Of the August applications, 1,200 were first applications and some 230 were new applications. Albania has the most applications in the region, four times higher than second place.

Almost a quarter of a million Albanians applied for asylum in an EU member state between 2008 and 2021, not counting the UK.

The numbers declined slightly in 2020, due to the pandemic, but as travel measures declined somewhat, the numbers rose again.

While Albania is considered a “safe place”, up to 10% of claims are accepted as founded. In addition, between 2008 and 2020, more than 700,000 Albanians received a residence permit in the EU.

The reduction of asylum requests is a condition for the opening of the first intergovernmental conference which marks the official start of negotiations for accession to the EU. A decision is expected in December following a series of rejections, although the EC has said all conditions have been met.

You can read a detailed report on Albanian asylum here.

Analysis: The Albanian asylum problem


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Confronting the Kremlin’s New Hybrid War in Europe by Anders Åslund https://westielovers.com/confronting-the-kremlins-new-hybrid-war-in-europe-by-anders-aslund/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/confronting-the-kremlins-new-hybrid-war-in-europe-by-anders-aslund/ With the Kremlin’s intention to divide and weaken the European Union, and now to seek vulnerabilities, the Western powers must unite and issue a strong response. History has shown that one should not put up with or turn a blind eye to Russian military, political and economic provocations. STOCKHOLM – As winter approaches, the Kremlin […]]]>

With the Kremlin’s intention to divide and weaken the European Union, and now to seek vulnerabilities, the Western powers must unite and issue a strong response. History has shown that one should not put up with or turn a blind eye to Russian military, political and economic provocations.

STOCKHOLM – As winter approaches, the Kremlin wreaks havoc in Europe. His latest machinations include a gas war against the countries of Central and Eastern Europe; a migration crisis along Belarusian borders with Lithuania, Latvia and Poland; renewed military mobilization on the eastern border of Ukraine; and agitation for Serbian secession from Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Although this campaign has multiple objectives, a common thread runs through it: the Kremlin’s desire to divide and weaken the European Union. This means getting German approval for the Nord Stream 2 pipeline as quickly as possible; disrupt the EU gas market, with a view to reverting to Soviet-style long-term contracts, with gas prices tied to oil; and weaken Ukraine and force Moldova to abandon its European Association Agreement and join Russia’s Eurasian Economic Union instead.

The Kremlin tends to send out test balls to see what it can do before hitting it hard if the opportunity arises. This means that the West – the US, the EU and the UK – will have to act quickly to deal with anything that follows. The biggest mistake one can make in responding to Russian provocations is to do nothing or to react too slowly and too gently. As Keir Giles of Chatham House argues, the West must recognize “that confrontation with Russia cannot be avoided because it is already happening”. History shows that “Russia respects force and despises compromise and compromise.”

Fortunately, the West already has many effective tools at its disposal, and with the arrival of a new German government that will likely be less friendly to Russian President Vladimir Putin, there is an opportunity for new strategic thinking.

The gas war should be easy enough to fight. On July 21, the United States and Germany released a joint statement on Nord Stream 2 declaring “their determination to hold Russia accountable for its aggression and malicious activities by imposing costs through sanctions and other tools. “. After four months of Russian escalation, the administration of US President Joe Biden should feel compelled to end its lifting of congressionally approved sanctions against Nord Stream 2 AG, and the German government should agree to it. This would quickly end the pipeline. But if the Biden administration does not act, Congress still can, adding new mandatory penalties to the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2022.

Europe currently has insufficient gas stocks because Gazprom maneuvered to create an artificial shortage. The Russian state-owned energy giant has a quarter of the gas storage capacity in Germany, Austria and the Netherlands, and has kept those facilities empty while filling its domestic tanks to the brim. The obvious solution is for the EU to ban Gazprom and other foreign suppliers from owning storage facilities in the EU and to impose minimum stock levels on existing storage capacity. Because the EU is effectively a monopsony (single buyer) of Gazprom’s gas, it should start operating collectively to reduce Gazprom’s monopoly power.

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Although the Biden administration has tolerated Nord Stream 2 (while banning the Keystone XL pipeline from Canada), it has otherwise refused to get involved in the European gas crisis. This must change. The United States is expected to supply Europe with liquid natural gas now that Europe has built the capacity to receive LNG cargoes.

As for the Belarusian border drama, we are witnessing a new type of hybrid war, provoked by the illegitimate ruler of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko. NATO and the EU should recognize the situation as such and offer their full support to Poland, Latvia and Lithuania. The EU’s Foreign Affairs Council was right to sanction all airlines and companies involved in smuggling people from the Middle East to the Belarusian border. The United States should follow suit by stepping up its own (rather soft) sanctions against Belarus.

Since Biden took office, the United States has stood up firmly in defense of Belarus’ southern neighbor, Ukraine. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky’s visit to the White House in September marked a turning point. In addition, no less than three U.S. cabinet secretaries have already visited Ukraine this year, and on November 10, the United States adopted a surprisingly strong U.S.-Ukraine charter on strategic partnership. The document urges the United States to support “Ukraine’s right to decide its own future direction in foreign policy without outside interference, including with regard to Ukraine’s aspirations to join NATO.” .

In addition to these promising developments, the Ukrainian government has just appointed its most respected member, Oleksiy Reznikov, as the new Minister of Defense. Fresh out of the Donbass trenches, he will soon be heading to Washington.

But the EU, NATO, Germany and France must act. At least they have all spoken out against Russian aggression against Ukraine in recent days. Impressively, the UK has committed 600 special forces to Ukraine.

If the new German government is serious about ensuring peace in Europe, the most effective thing it can do is welcome Ukraine into NATO. Ukraine has resisted Russian military aggression for years, serving as a bulwark for the rest of Europe. Germany is not ready to defend itself, so it should help Ukraine do so by supplying it with weapons, as the US, UK, Canada, Poland and Lithuania are already doing. .

Finally, there is the question of the Balkans. Tensions are mounting again in the former Yugoslavia because the EU reneged on its commitment to conduct accession negotiations with North Macedonia and Albania. In North Macedonia, a pro-European government has just lost power after making large concessions to the EU in exchange for nothing.

The EU would do better to seriously pursue the idea of ​​a “whole, free and peaceful Europe”, as George HW Bush said in May 1989. By immediately starting accession negotiations with North Macedonia and Albania, it can help deter Republika Srpska. to flirt with the secession of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The United States and the EU hold many valuable cards. But they will have to play them quickly and efficiently to repel the latest Russian assault.


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Aleksandar Vucic is a Jekyll and Hyde character – EURACTIV.com https://westielovers.com/aleksandar-vucic-is-a-jekyll-and-hyde-character-euractiv-com/ https://westielovers.com/aleksandar-vucic-is-a-jekyll-and-hyde-character-euractiv-com/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 10:34:16 +0000 https://westielovers.com/aleksandar-vucic-is-a-jekyll-and-hyde-character-euractiv-com/ Serbian leader Aleksandar Vucic has two characters. The pro-Western side of Dr Jekyll remains reserved in Brussels, EU capitals and Washington, while the country’s citizens get Mr Hyde, who is slowly transforming Serbia into a postmodern Weimar Republic, said Srdjan Cvijić to EURACTIV in an interview. Srdjan Cvijić is a member of the Advisory Group […]]]>

Serbian leader Aleksandar Vucic has two characters. The pro-Western side of Dr Jekyll remains reserved in Brussels, EU capitals and Washington, while the country’s citizens get Mr Hyde, who is slowly transforming Serbia into a postmodern Weimar Republic, said Srdjan Cvijić to EURACTIV in an interview.

Srdjan Cvijić is a member of the Advisory Group on Balkan Policy in Europe.

He spoke with EURACTIV editor-in-chief Georgi Gotev.

What do we fail to understand in Brussels about the strongman of Serbia, Aleksandar Vucic, and of Serbia in general?

The problem is that some Brussels residents do not see the continuity of the democratic retreat and anti-Western policies of the Serbian regime since the coming to power of Aleksandar Vučić’s party in 2012. The pro-Western side, Dr Jekyll, Serbian politics remains reserved for Brussels. , other EU capitals and Washington. The citizens of the country receive their daily drop from Mr. Hyde, who is slowly transforming Serbia into a postmodern Weimar Republic.

The deployment of police to protect graffiti painted in honor of war criminal Ratko Mladic is just the latest installment in a long series. Since 2012, when Vučić’s party came to power, the pro-government media have fed the population with a daily dose of anti-Western, pro-Russian, pro-Chinese and above all nationalist propaganda. The difference between the period before they came to power is striking.

While the pre-2012 government extradited war criminals such as Ratko Mladić and Radovan Karadžić to the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague, this government honors convicted war criminals. Such revisionist policies of the Serbian regime are an accompaniment to a more general “orbanization” of the country, which the services of the European Commission document well in their annual reports, but which their political leaders within the Commission do not put forward. of their public appearances. .

Does Vučić succeed in getting the message across to the West that there is no alternative to his rule?

Unfortunately, yes, and that’s a big deal. Let me remind you that Milosevic deployed precisely the same tactics with Western partners in the 1990s. In 1995, he was called a “guarantor of peace and stability” when it was necessary to conclude the negotiations. Dayton Peace Accords in Bosnia. Only 2-3 years later, we had the start of an armed conflict in Kosovo, the NATO bombings in 1999, and Milosevic was seen in a real light, as the international outcast he had been since very beginning. The two situations are not comparable, despite the latest developments in Bosnia in particular. I believe there is no appetite for armed conflict among the people of the region. Yet I don’t believe Vučić will deliver anything of importance that he promised to his Western interlocutors. It is of course in his best interests to maintain the impression that he is working towards this goal for this, and that partly keeps him in power.

The survival of the Serbian regime rests on two seemingly opposed pillars: Dr Jekyll abroad and Mr Hyde in Serbia. On the one hand, what brought Vučić to power is a superficial departure from his former far-right nationalist positions. In this sense, any clear and serious break in relations with the West and a full return to pre-2012 policies would entail its downfall. Crossing the red line, heading towards Lukashenko’s Belarus, would alienate the country’s silent majority.

For a large part of the population, Serbia’s pro-Western and pro-EU orientation, despite growing skepticism, remains synonymous with stability and prosperity. A clear break with this geopolitical course would scare voters away. On the other hand, Vučić believes he must respond to his right-wing electoral base. We thus have the daily internal nationalist propaganda propagated by the regime, the recent “defense” of Mladic’s graffiti is an example. Such policies are not only poisonous because they radicalize the Serbian population, but are also detrimental to any attempt to strengthen regional cooperation, such as efforts to establish a common economic and political area in the region (Open Balkans or Market regional cooperation within the framework of the Berlin process) on its way to EU membership.

What should the EU’s strategy be towards Serbia? Does Vučić want to progress?

I think Vučić and the ruling oligarchy in Serbia do not take EU membership seriously. Rewarding the current Belgrade regime with the opening of new negotiating groups in the face of the painfully evident deterioration of the rule of law and democratic standards in the country would be detrimental to the legitimacy of the entire accession process. What message would this send to North Macedonia and Albania, which cannot even start negotiations due to bilateral issues with only one Member State?

Either the European Commission starts negotiating with everyone, which would not be a bad solution, or it must refrain from rewarding the authoritarians and punishing the democrats in the region. We have all seen how this policy ended with the municipal elections in North Macedonia and the fall of the Zaev government. EU policy is to a large extent responsible for these results.

Should the EU wait for democratic change, or should it be more direct with its messages?

The EU should be more direct with its messages, and yes, it will work in Serbia. Twelve years of experience should have been enough to show that a false slap on the back of Serbian Orbán was useless. The Serbian regime has no real alternative to the EU and the West. I hope that the days when Belgrade used Putin and the Chinese as scarecrows to scare Brussels and Washington are behind us and that the leaders of the EU and the United States can see through this bluff. If ultimately confirmed, US President Joe Biden’s decision not to invite Serbia, Hungary and Turkey to his democracy summit in December is a step in the right direction, and the EU should follow suit.

How could the EU help the democratic forces in Serbia?

First and foremost, by telling the truth in power in Belgrade and making sure that the Serbian people hear it. For this, it is vital to liberate the media sphere in the country. EU-funded organizations such as the European Foundation for Democracy are already doing the job, but it is not enough.

The European Commission must provide more direct and solid aid. Currently, the situation is such that all television channels have a national frequency, and most dailies are direct spokespersons for the regime. They are also generously funded by the Serbian government. Twitter, for example, recently referred to all of these pro-regime media outlets as “affiliated with the state.” Without direct government funding, they will not have a head start in the market game with other disadvantaged professional media.

While it is more difficult for the EU to force the Serbian regime to, for example, distribute national television frequencies equitably, this can help alleviate the disadvantage of the independent media market by providing them with direct funding for the contents. It’s not that pro-regime media are better at selling their content. They have the government money to keep their costs down and to bail them out when needed.


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28th meeting of the European Integration Committee https://westielovers.com/28th-meeting-of-the-european-integration-committee/ https://westielovers.com/28th-meeting-of-the-european-integration-committee/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 12:24:22 +0000 https://westielovers.com/28th-meeting-of-the-european-integration-committee/ Introducing the report, European Integration Minister Jadranka Joksimovic expressed her satisfaction that the EU duly noted all that we had achieved the previous year, which was a challenge for Serbia, as well as for the whole Europe. Serbia is the only candidate country to have fully accepted the new methodology, in the form of clusters, […]]]>

Introducing the report, European Integration Minister Jadranka Joksimovic expressed her satisfaction that the EU duly noted all that we had achieved the previous year, which was a challenge for Serbia, as well as for the whole Europe. Serbia is the only candidate country to have fully accepted the new methodology, in the form of clusters, which was also recognized in the EC report, said Joksimovic.

After discussion, the members of the committee unanimously decided to propose to the National Assembly to adopt the report on the negotiations for the accession of the Republic of Serbia to the EU during the Portuguese Presidency.

In the aftermath, the Head of the EU Delegation to Serbia, Emanuele Giaufret, presented the European Commission’s 2021 report on the Republic of Serbia, saying he recognizes Serbia’s commitment to achieve results in reform processes and drew attention to areas that needed further work.

Ambassador Giaufret particularly insisted on the part of the Report devoted to the work of the National Assembly, underlining its constructive engagement in inter-party dialogue. He welcomed the fact that the number of laws adopted by emergency procedure had been reduced and that the work of the National Assembly was carefully planned during the regular meetings of the Collegium. The ambassador added that the report also notes that the activity reports of independent regulatory bodies are examined during sessions of the National Assembly and that the Institute of Parliamentary Questions is held regularly on the last Thursday of the month.

The head of the EU delegation to Serbia said that what is needed is a systematic application of the code of ethics, as well as a more systematic application of the recommendations of independent regulatory bodies and constant cooperation with civil society organizations, the National Convention on the EU in particular.

Ambassador Giaufret also spoke in detail about the progress assessments by cluster.

Concluding his presentation, he said that despite the challenges ahead, positive progress had been made in the previous year, and said he was convinced that the EU is also committed to Serbia and the Western Balkans, as well. than the enlargement policy, as it has been up to now. The EU remains Serbia’s biggest partner, he stressed.

Following a discussion, the committee members determined the proposed conclusion on the 2021 report of the European Commission on the Republic of Serbia and forwarded it to the National Assembly for consideration and adoption.

The session was chaired by the chairperson of the committee Elvira Kovacs, and in the presence of the following members and alternate members of the committee: Vuk Mircetic, Ljiljana Malusic, Dubravka Filipovski, Ana Miljanic, Viktor Jevtovic, Stanislava Janosevic, Vesna Rankovic, Dijana Radovic, Predrag Rajic, Nemanja Joksimovic, Vesna Markovic, Ana Pesic and Dusica Stojkovic.


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N. Dendias: Ankara must prove in practice that it wants a constructive dialogue https://westielovers.com/n-dendias-ankara-must-prove-in-practice-that-it-wants-a-constructive-dialogue/ https://westielovers.com/n-dendias-ankara-must-prove-in-practice-that-it-wants-a-constructive-dialogue/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 16:07:59 +0000 https://westielovers.com/n-dendias-ankara-must-prove-in-practice-that-it-wants-a-constructive-dialogue/ The message that Greece will continue to defend its interests, having as a compass full respect for international law and in particular the law of the sea, is sent in an interview granted Sunday evening by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Nikos Dendias. Nikos Dendias also maintains that Ankara must prove in practice that it […]]]>

The message that Greece will continue to defend its interests, having as a compass full respect for international law and in particular the law of the sea, is sent in an interview granted Sunday evening by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Nikos Dendias.

Nikos Dendias also maintains that Ankara must prove in practice that it wants a sincere and constructive dialogue, stressing that currently, unfortunately, through its fault, we have a dialogue of the deaf and specifies that Greece “consents” to practices irrational youth. Ottoman demands is unthinkable to exist.

Referring to Turkey’s current policy, he notes that it unfortunately has nothing to do with the policy of rapprochement with the EU and that with its expansionist neo-Ottoman policy it has managed to have problems with almost all States in its immediate vicinity. Styling Turkish actions, he qualifies them as totally unacceptable and emphasizes that they violate all notions of international law and common sense. He points out that one of the most typical examples – among many others – was the harassment by Turkey last September of the research vessel “Nautical Geo”, which was in the Greek exclusive economic zone, 10 miles away. sailors in eastern Crete. this point is a Turkish continental shelf.

Regarding the prospects for normalization of Greek-Turkish relations, he clearly underlines that they would exist provided that Turkey respects international law, stops threatening our country with war if it exercises its legal rights and violates the fundamental provisions of the Charter of United Nations. . “Despite the climate of tension that Turkey continues to cultivate, both on the ground and at the level of rhetoric, we consider it appropriate to maintain open channels of communication with the neighbor,” he added. conciliation with Turkey, always within the framework of the full protection of our sovereignty and our sovereign rights ”. At the same time, he notes that a significant part of Turkish society is still eagerly awaiting its European perspective.

“The future of the Western Balkans lies in the EU”

The Minister of Foreign Affairs then reminded North Macedonia, other countries in the region, international interlocutors and especially European partners, that the future of the Western Balkans lies in the EU. “The European perspective and the accession process itself are those which will ensure the stability of the countries and peoples of the region, economic development, prosperity, democratic reforms. This is the only way for the region to move forward, ”says Nikos Dendias characteristically.

At the same time, he recalls that there are other active forces in the region, in addition to the European forces, which aim to withdraw the Western Balkans from Europe, by offering so-called development aid, military cooperation, even cooperation in the field of education and even through organizations which have more relations with the Muslim Brotherhood and little or no connection with a modern European educational framework. Powers that invoke historical, cultural and religious traditions allegedly shared with the countries and peoples of the region, but essentially promote extreme ideologies and a destabilizing agenda, he adds.

In this context, he calls on the one hand on the whole of the Western Balkans to remain attached to their European trajectory and to turn their backs on the forces of isolation and destabilization, and on the other hand, the EU to maintain the momentum. of the enlargement process. return to their “Balkan past”.

Asked about the current political developments in North Macedonia, Nikos Dendias reiterates the need for a full, consistent and good faith implementation of the Prespa Agreement and notes that governments come and go, states and commitments, but they remain.

Referring to his contacts with North Macedonian officials over the past two months, he stressed that the two main questions put to him are his European perspective and how Greece can help in this direction, as well as strengthening bilateral ties in all sectors such as the economy, investment, energy, transport and defense. The surveillance of the airspace of our neighboring country by our Air Force is already tangible proof of the mutual benefit that can exist, he said. He also stressed to them that our country can, under certain conditions, become North Macedonia’s best friend in the future and that Greece looks forward to continuing cooperation in all sectors with any government that emerges from internal processes.

“Defense agreements with France and the United States are multipliers of the country’s political and defensive power”

Finally, concerning Greek foreign policy over the past two years, she affirms that our country has a say in regional developments, as evidenced by its invitation to the Conference on Libya convened by President Macron and makes particular reference to the agreements of defense with France. and the United States. “Defense agreements with France and the United States are multipliers of the country’s defensive and political power in the international environment and will be used. The countries with which we have signed the agreements strongly support Greece and have an interest in her being strong and stable. And of course, we must not ignore the defense agreement with the United Arab Emirates. ”Stressing the importance of these agreements, he recalls that they are the recognition of the strategic and stabilizing role that Greece plays from the Balkans to the Eastern Mediterranean and underlines that it is up to our country to use these agreements which will make it strong against the revisionist forces.

In addition, he notes that Greece is implementing a strategy to strengthen its relations with a number of countries, with which – like the countries of the African continent – relations were not so strong. Referring to his contacts in Rwanda yesterday, he said he hoped more such visits to countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America would follow soon, as the pandemic would allow. .

Source: RES-EAP


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