Visible Economic Issues – Westie Lovers http://westielovers.com/ Tue, 10 May 2022 12:27:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://westielovers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-icon-32x32.png Visible Economic Issues – Westie Lovers http://westielovers.com/ 32 32 Crypto Moves – El Salvador buys 500 Bitcoins despite a sharp drop in value https://westielovers.com/crypto-moves-el-salvador-buys-500-bitcoins-despite-a-sharp-drop-in-value/ Tue, 10 May 2022 12:27:13 +0000 https://westielovers.com/crypto-moves-el-salvador-buys-500-bitcoins-despite-a-sharp-drop-in-value/ China In-Focus — Tesla denies halting production at Shanghai factory; Geely takes stake in Renault Korea BEIJING (Reuters) – Electric vehicle maker Tesla has denied halting production at its Shanghai factory, despite reports that it has halted most operations due to issues securing parts. Reuters reported that according to an internal memo seen by the […]]]>

China In-Focus — Tesla denies halting production at Shanghai factory; Geely takes stake in Renault Korea

BEIJING (Reuters) – Electric vehicle maker Tesla has denied halting production at its Shanghai factory, despite reports that it has halted most operations due to issues securing parts.

Reuters reported that according to an internal memo seen by the news agency, the plant plans to make fewer than 200 vehicles on Tuesday – far fewer than the roughly 1,200 units it has been building every day since shortly after reopening on Tuesday. April 19 following a 22- day closure.

Two sources familiar with the matter previously said supply issues forced the factory to halt production on Monday.

The company refuted the report, saying it had not halted production at the site, although a spokesperson for the US automaker acknowledged it was experiencing some disruption to logistics amid the lockdown. long standing Covid-19 in the city.

Shanghai is in its sixth week of an intensified COVID-19 lockdown that has tested manufacturers’ ability to operate amid tight restrictions on the movement of people and materials.

Tesla had planned just last week to ramp up production to pre-lockdown levels by next week.

It was not immediately clear when the current supply issues might be resolved, said the people, who asked not to be identified because production plans are private.

Chinese Geely takes a stake in Renault Korea

China’s Geely Automobile will buy just over a third of Renault’s Korean unit for around $200 million, potentially helping it boost US exports and freeing up funds for the French automaker to invest in its electric business .

Renault, which can assemble 300,000 vehicles a year at its plant in Busan, South Korea, is in a turnaround aimed at boosting its margins and separating its electric vehicle business to catch up with rivals such as Tesla.

The French company’s decision to sell the stake to Geely – which owns Volvo Cars and a 9.7% stake in Daimler AG – follows the two companies’ announcement in January to develop hybrid vehicles for Korea from the South and overseas, produced at the Busan factory.

For Geely, which has typically grown its business through global partnerships, the deal goes beyond selling cars in South Korea and is a way for the Chinese automaker to export cars made in South Korea. to America, said a person close to the company.

“It’s an open door to the United States,” said the person, who declined to be named because the plans are confidential.

(Contributed by Reuters)

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Extreme weather is more of a threat than Covid | Daily Express Online https://westielovers.com/extreme-weather-is-more-of-a-threat-than-covid-daily-express-online/ Sun, 08 May 2022 12:08:06 +0000 https://westielovers.com/extreme-weather-is-more-of-a-threat-than-covid-daily-express-online/ PEOPLE want companies to engage more, not less, with societal issues. That’s according to the Edelman Trust Barometer 2022, which features the results of a survey of 36,000 people in 28 countries. According to the survey, people believe that societal leadership is at the heart of business. They also believe that business is an effective […]]]>
PEOPLE want companies to engage more, not less, with societal issues. That’s according to the Edelman Trust Barometer 2022, which features the results of a survey of 36,000 people in 28 countries.

According to the survey, people believe that societal leadership is at the heart of business. They also believe that business is an effective driver of positive change. And yet respondents believe companies are not doing enough to address issues such as climate change, economic inequality, retraining of the workforce and unreliable information. More than half say capitalism does more harm than good in the world.

At INSEAD, we pay close attention to trends like these, as they help inform our agenda as a global business school. We pay particular attention to six global trends impacting business and society. These trends, which present both serious risks and significant opportunities for business, have implications for our school’s activities in 2022.

Here, we offer key insights from the leaders and organizations closest to the issues.

The climate is the top priority

Today’s most serious threat to humanity is not Covid-19, despite what the headlines may imply. Global leaders and experts interviewed for the World Economic Forum’s (WEF) Global Risks Report 2022 cite environmental issues as the biggest global risks in the short, medium and long term. Extreme weather, failed climate action and threats to biodiversity are of greatest concern.

The urgency of this issue has grown over the past two years, both because the pandemic has stalled progress towards a green transition and because countries have responded to the climate emergency with an inadequate response.

For example, while 197 countries signed up to the Glasgow Climate Pact at the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26), their commitment is not expected to meet the 1.5°C target set by the Paris climate agreement of 2016.

Inequalities between and within countries make matters worse. Oxfam International estimates that the top 1% of people produce twice as much emissions as the bottom 50%. And yet, the less fortunate will suffer the consequences. By 2030, it is estimated that the climate crisis will kill around 231,000 people in poor countries each year.

Socio-economic risks are increasing

As the pandemic persists, socio-economic problems are worsening. Globally, the economic recovery is slowing due to inflation spikes, debt crises, rising commodity prices and supply chain bottlenecks. “Livelihood crises” are on the rise among low-income households, a segment particularly affected by rising prices and high indebtedness.

By 2024, the global economy is expected to be 2.3% smaller than it would have been without the pandemic. Labor market imbalances, protectionist policies, and education and skills disparities are expected to create further divergence in economies around the world. By 2024, economic growth in advanced economies is expected to exceed pre-pandemic growth by 0.9%. However, in developing countries (excluding China), economic growth is expected to fall 5.5pc below pre-pandemic growth. Growth in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa is expected to slow further.

Inequality is rising in most countries

Failures to equitably distribute the Covid-19 vaccine have hurt the world’s poorest countries the most. Although half of the world’s population has already received two doses of the vaccine, only 7% of Africa is fully vaccinated. Inequalities have also widened in the areas of health, education, digital access and economic growth, which mainly affects the poor, women and girls and visible minorities. Since the start of the pandemic, the timeframe to achieve gender parity has moved back an entire generation, from 99 to 135 years.

Wealth inequality continues to rise. Today, the richest 10% of the world’s population own 76% of all wealth, while the poorest half own only 2%. Multi-millionaires – representing just 1% of Earth’s inhabitants – have also captured 38% of all additional wealth accumulated since the mid-1990s.

However, data on income inequality show different trajectories. Over the past two decades, income inequality within countries has increased significantly while income inequality between countries has decreased. The World Inequality Report 2021 indicates that the gap between the average incomes of the richest 10% and the poorest 50% within countries has almost doubled, from 8.5 to 15 times. Yet the gap between the average incomes of the richest 10% of countries and the poorest 50% of countries has shrunk from about 50 times to less than 40 times.

Distrust of key institutions is growing

Lack of trust in key institutions has reached critical levels. Nearly six in 10 people say they instinctively distrust something until evidence suggests otherwise. The government and the media fuel a “cycle of mistrust”, with nearly one in two people perceiving these institutions as divisive forces in society. Democratic governments are even less trustworthy than autocratic regimes.

Increasingly, consumers and employees are holding companies accountable for their role in society. They also want CEOs to take a stand on the issues. The Edelman survey reports that beliefs and values ​​now guide key decisions such as buying or promoting brands (58%), choosing a workplace (60%) and investing (64% ). Most institutional investors (88%) also review an investment’s commitment to ESG (environmental, social and governance) factors as much as its operational and financial practices. Meanwhile, activists take to the streets to protest greenwashing as litigants sue corporate giants for failing to deliver on climate pledges, putting increased pressure on companies and investors to they are tackling climate change in a meaningful way.

Converging ESG reporting metrics

For years, ESG reporting lacked rigor and consistency due to the lack of a single ESG accounting framework. This has created difficulties for investors seeking to compare corporate commitments and has also fueled discontent over the greenwashing of sustainable investments. However, in November the International Sustainability Standards Board (ISSB) was formed to create a formal set of accounting standards for investors and the general public.

The convergence of metrics for ESG and sustainability will help organizations make a firm commitment to these factors and integrate them into their business strategy. The new standards will also help monitor large-scale ambitions that have historically been difficult to measure, such as contributions to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

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Technology regulation is gaining importance

Our dependence on technology, coupled with the acceleration of technological innovation, has increased the need for new regulatory tools and policies. The challenge for policy makers is to develop approaches that protect consumer privacy, speech and security without stifling growth or inhibiting innovation. Governments and businesses must also work together to rebuild trust and moderate misinformation in digital spaces. This will require an agile, flexible and transparent approach to governance as well as global cooperation and collaboration, especially to address rapidly evolving cybersecurity threats.

Overall a trend in the right direction

Because of these and other global risks, 84% of global experts and leaders in the WEF report say they are “worried” or “concerned” about the outlook for the world. We share their concerns. But we also see these risks from another angle. These are reasons to act. These are definite reminders that responsible business matters. They motivate us to work harder for people and the planet. Ultimately, this puts us all in a better position – not just to manage other risks, but to weather the next crisis that awaits us.

– Ilian Mihov is Dean of INSEAD, Professor of Economics and Rausing Professor of Economic and Business Transformation at INSEAD. He is also Academic Director of the Hoffmann Global Institute for Business and Society. Katell Le Goulven is Executive Director of the Hoffmann Global Institute for Business and Society at INSEAD. Mark Stabile is Professor of Economics at INSEAD, Stone Professor of Wealth Inequality and Academic Director of the James M and Cathleen D Stone Center for the Study of Wealth Inequality. He is also Deputy Academic Director of the Hoffmann Global Institute for Business and Society. This appeared in Edge

– The opinions expressed here are those of the writer Ilian Mihov and do not necessarily reflect those of the Daily Express.

– If you have something to share, write to us at: [email protected]

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Kinder in Color event breaks down racial barriers on historic day for Peak District https://westielovers.com/kinder-in-color-event-breaks-down-racial-barriers-on-historic-day-for-peak-district/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 15:31:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/kinder-in-color-event-breaks-down-racial-barriers-on-historic-day-for-peak-district/ Kinder in Color on Sunday April 24 brought together individuals, groups and organizations from across the country, including Peaks of Colour, Wanderers of Color and the Sheffield Environmental Movement (SEM). SEM founder Maxwell Ayamba, a PhD student who studies racial ecology and environmental justice, said: ‘It was the first-ever mass gathering of black people and […]]]>

Kinder in Color on Sunday April 24 brought together individuals, groups and organizations from across the country, including Peaks of Colour, Wanderers of Color and the Sheffield Environmental Movement (SEM).

SEM founder Maxwell Ayamba, a PhD student who studies racial ecology and environmental justice, said: ‘It was the first-ever mass gathering of black people and people of color in Great Britain’s history. rural Brittany and we were overwhelmed with turnout.

“Having people of all racial backgrounds coming together, celebrating and marching to Kinder in all their diversity was wonderful to see. It was a joyful moment that I will remember forever. »

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Organizers believe it was the largest such gathering ever seen in rural Britain.

He added: “There were also a lot of white people who joined us. This demonstrates the unity we need to expand roaming rights and ensure that people from all walks of life have access to these spaces.

“Hikers said they had never set foot in this kind of place before. They came not knowing what to expect or how welcome they would be. This opened a new chapter in their lives.

Issues of rural inclusiveness have become increasingly visible in recent years, with some estimates that black people and people of color make up just one per cent of all visits to UK national parks.

The situation was summed up by an incident last year when a group of Muslim hikers received a torrent of racist abuse online for hiking up Mam Tor on Christmas Day.

Sheffield-based Peaks in Color walking club was one of many organizations that came forward. (Photo: Evie Muir)

The Peak District Park Authority and other public agencies have launched a series of policy measures, met halfway by local initiatives – but more needs to be done.

Nadia Shah, one of the organizers of the event, said: “As a half-Pakistani, half-Geordie, arriving at the door of the pub after a long walk still fills me with hesitation.

“Despite some progress over the past decade and the well-intentioned efforts of outdoor initiatives, the countryside remains a blank space. You are looked at differently and sometimes, unfortunately, you are also treated differently.

She added: “The conservation sector, where I work, is the second least diverse sector in the country. The least is agriculture. The people who live in the countryside are predominantly white. We want the countryside to become a more diverse and inclusive place.

The historic scene evokes the original spirit of the Kinder Mass Trespass, which eventually paved the way for the establishment of the national park.

Barriers to access extend far beyond the national park and exacerbate social and economic inequalities in more urban areas.

A 2020 report by the Ramblers Association found that only 39% of people of black, Asian or minority background lived within a five-minute walk of a green space, compared to 58% of whites.

More than two-fifths of people from ethnic minorities live in the most green-deprived neighborhoods in England, compared to just one in five white people, according to data produced the same year by Friends of the Earth.

Maxwell said: “If you look at the history of mass intrusion, at that time it was a class issue. Now there are also more issues of race and privilege.

“First, these spaces are perceived as racialized into whiteness by communities of color. Second, it’s the well-to-do who have the most access – they have good jobs, free time, can afford proper outdoor gear, and cars to take them where public transport can’t. .

He added: “Physical inactivity costs the NHS £1billion a year and society at large £7billion. Air quality in cities is a big issue, and the impact of the pandemic has been greater among communities of color because they lack access to outdoor spaces.

“The racialization and commodification of the English countryside makes events like this so important for democratizing the space.”

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In addition to the march, the day-long event included speeches by activists, nature education sessions and ceremonies designed to reconnect people with the land, coordinated by the Right to Roam campaign group, which advocates greater access to the countryside for everyone in Britain.

Spokesman Sam Siva said: “Kinder’s original intrusion saw the children of Jews and migrants, Quakers and nonconformists stepping from the margins of British society to strike at the privileged hearts of its landed elite.

“They were vilified as outsiders, but their actions paved the way for access rights now enjoyed by everyone in Britain. A diverse and inclusive campaign means more rights for everyone to connect with the land. Today, black people and people of color are coming together to finish the job.

Sam added: “By connecting with nature, celebrating our rich cultures and dreams, we can create a new culture for the countryside – a culture that embraces change, knowledge exchange, biodiversity and difference. “

Last week it emerged the government had canceled a review of the right to move in the English countryside. Defending a status quo in which legal restrictions already prevent people from moving freely on 92% of the country’s land, Commons Leader Mark Spencer described the countryside as “a place of business“.

Maxwell said: “If you look at the 2019 Glover review, it shows that we all pay for these national landscapes through taxes, but they still feel exclusive. Extending roaming rights will help many people access these spaces.

“The new police bill is expected to make trespassing a criminal offense rather than a civil offence, which will make people fearful of walking in places they don’t know and will extend historic issues between police and people of color from the cities to the countryside.”

He added: ‘The Peak District National Park is doing its best, some landowners actually want to open up trails and it’s part of the government’s own agenda to promote rural communities as fair – but if the recommendations aren’t followed and there is no funding, it will mean nothing.

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How to Assess Community Resilience https://westielovers.com/how-to-assess-community-resilience/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 14:43:37 +0000 https://westielovers.com/how-to-assess-community-resilience/ For the ranching communities on the east side of the Baja California Peninsula, groundwater springs are their main source of fresh water. The economic livelihoods of around 4,000 people, who call themselves Choyeros, are closely tied to springs and wells, which provide water for their families and livestock. Communities like this, large and small, exist […]]]>

For the ranching communities on the east side of the Baja California Peninsula, groundwater springs are their main source of fresh water. The economic livelihoods of around 4,000 people, who call themselves Choyeros, are closely tied to springs and wells, which provide water for their families and livestock.

Communities like this, large and small, exist throughout the West, where water is life. Social systems are linked to water supply systems, so water supply challenges are social challenges. To understand how the connection between these systems affects the resilience of community water supplies, researchers from the University of Utah and their colleagues developed a new framework for thinking about the social resilience of water.

Water supply problems can be local or regional, they write, and can happen quickly or slowly. A highly resilient society can react on the same scales of time or space, while a society that cannot be in trouble. The study is published in sustainability science.

What does this resilience framework mean for the Choyeros? Read on – first let’s talk about the framework and the cross-disciplinary collaboration that created it.

Resilience across time and space scales

The story begins in a faculty “think tank” organized by the U’s Center for Global Change and Sustainability (GCSC). Brenda Bowen, GCSC director and professor of geology and geophysics, listened to anthropologist Shane Macfarlan discuss the work he and his colleagues had done with the Choyeros, documenting how and when members of their society discovered plants, animals and other elements of the natural world around them. The research team had, over several years, built a relationship of trust with the Choyeros, as well as an understanding of the community and the issues it faces.

Bowen made the connection between the spring-fed society of the Choyeros and the work that U-graduate Jory Lerback, now at UCLA, had done on spring geology and hydrology.

“The community lives in close proximity to water, land, and the ecosystem,” says Bowen, “and thus presented a unique opportunity to explore the connections between people, water, and place.”

Inspired, Bowen, Lerback and Macfarlan assembled an interdisciplinary research team, with the help of seed funding from GCSC, the U’s Society, Water & Climate group of teachers, and the NEXUS Institutean interdisciplinary research group in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. The team also included Eric Schniter from California State University Fullerton, Juan Jose Garcia from Salt Lake Community College and Liliana Caughman from Arizona State University.

But the team of social and physical scientists needed to find a common language to talk about hydrological and social systems.

“We needed a way to step back from the siled disciplines of the ivory tower and think more about common goals,” says Lerback.

Looking at the available data and the research questions they wanted to ask, the team focused on the themes of space and time. You’ll see this in the framework outlines below. Both systems – social and hydrological – have dimensions of space (on the horizontal axis) and time (on the vertical axis).

Let’s take a few examples to illustrate this framework. It may be a suburb of a large metropolitan area that is experiencing short-term contamination of its water supply. The timescale of the problem is relatively short, perhaps a few days, and limited in space, on the order of a few square miles (tens of square kilometers). In the hydrological framework, you can represent this vulnerability by a small square in the lower left corner.

The human response could also be limited in time and space, and could include using social channels to communicate a boil order to affected neighborhoods or trucking clean water to a central location. In the context of human behavior, the answer would also be a small square in the lower left corner. The squares overlap. The community is resilient.

But what happens when these squares do not overlap? For example, if the hydrological challenge is on the scale of regional or even global climate change? Trucking in water for a few days won’t be enough.

“When human and ‘non-human’ or aquatic systems operate on vastly different spatial and/or temporal scales, there is an opportunity to develop policy precisely to bridge these gaps,” says Bowen. Another example, if climate change is a global issue and policies to halt climate change are local, then perhaps coordination between local communities can expand the scale of human response to match the magnitude of the problem.

“We hope this is a way to see how the ideas fit together and represent a top-notch approach to defining mutual goals,” Macfarlan said. “We see this framework as a tool to generate conversations across many groups and less as a prescriptive political tool.”

The resilience of the Choyeros

Back to the Choyeros, with their small community and their only water point. This community, Macfarlan says, removes some of the confounding factors that might arise in a study of, say, the Salt Lake Valley.

“While working in a small community (about 115 people) means we have less data overall, it does mean we have a deeper insight into each data point (which are real people we know well) and a more great ability to interpret our results by communicating directly with the people participating in this study.

“In a small area,” adds Lerback, “water movement is more visible and not ‘abstracted’ by infrastructure like in many cities, where measurements of water use are generally more available but probably less significant.

A researcher takes readings from a recently dug shallow well about 650 feet (200 m) downstream from a spring.

The team therefore began to assess the scales of social and hydrological resilience. They asked the Choyeros about their experiences and knowledge about the spring (Have you ever seen a spring dry up in your life? What makes springs exist?) as well as their social systems (When livestock disappears or you want to sell handicrafts, who do you ask for help?).

Only one of the people on the 31 ranches interviewed had heard a second-hand story about the spring drying up. But 26 expressed concern that it could one day happen. Water was shared between ranches, they found, with sharing occurring more often between ranches close to each other or sharing labor with each other.

At the same time, the researchers measured the amounts of carbon-14 and tritium isotopes in the water to gauge the residence time of the water, or how long it had spent underground before returning to the surface. . This would give an idea of ​​how quickly weather conditions could affect spring – and how long it would take to recover.

The water ages they found ranged from about 75 years to 230 years. This suggests that, at least to some extent, changes in precipitation amounts could lead to changes in spring production over human lifetimes.

So how might their water future change? If the increased demand for well water lowers the water table, the springs could reduce their production. On similar timescales, herders can share water and build water infrastructure to distribute throughout the community. These squares, according to the resilience framework, overlap.

But climate change and changes in land use could cause the amounts of water entering the soil to decrease, a process that occurs on the scale of tens to hundreds of years and occurs over larger surfaces. Current social systems may not be able to respond. The squares overlap slightly.

When a household does not have direct access to a spring or well, they truck in barrels of water from a nearby ranch that has access to a spring. This trip should be taken every five days, taking about two hours each time

How is this framework useful in planning for the future? If the Choyeros decide to improve their resilience, then they can consider this framework as a starting point. Perhaps they would like to geographically expand their water sharing network or put in place measures to ensure long-term water storage.

The study sheds light on a cultural group that has received little attention in Mexico, Macfarlan says, “but connects them to hydrological processes that are relevant to many parts of the world, including the arid southwestern United States. “.

The framework is relatively simple, Lerback says, compared to water use models that might otherwise be used to assess resilience. “These are data-intensive, time-consuming to build and test,” she says, “and are often presented as a ‘black box’ rather where the methods are a bit opaque, where you can test scenarios and see the expected results, but required a lot of trust with the developers.

Lessons for the Salt Lake Valley

Although an analysis of the resilience of the Salt Lake Valley is not part of this study, the authors argue that the framework that applied to the small community of Choyero can also be applied to the bustling front of Wasatch.

“As we need more water resources,” says Bowen, “we need to expand our reach either spatially, such as moving water from rivers for municipal use, or temporally, such as capturing seasonal water resources in reservoirs to extend the period of availability, or the exploitation of groundwater that has recharged thousands of years ago.

The team looks forward to seeing how this interdisciplinary framework can apply to other areas, including food production and waste management. The experience, they say, was beneficial for everyone involved.

“It’s a way for academics to have a bit of humility,” says Macfarlan. “There needs to be a way to communicate and understand things intuitively, it will help build trusting relationships and believing in numbers.”

See the full study here.

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Hamak Gold Limited Shines After Positive Liberia Project News https://westielovers.com/hamak-gold-limited-shines-after-positive-liberia-project-news/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 14:27:31 +0000 https://westielovers.com/hamak-gold-limited-shines-after-positive-liberia-project-news/ Shares of Hamak Gold Limited (LSE:HAMA) shine after a positive update from one of its projects in Liberia. The company announced positive gold and multi-element exploration results from the first grid block soil sampling in the Gozohn license. Karl Smithson, Executive Director, said: “We are very encouraged that our initial soil sampling results have successfully […]]]>

Shares of Hamak Gold Limited (LSE:HAMA) shine after a positive update from one of its projects in Liberia.

The company announced positive gold and multi-element exploration results from the first grid block soil sampling in the Gozohn license.

Karl Smithson, Executive Director, said: “We are very encouraged that our initial soil sampling results have successfully identified significant gold anomalies within our priority target area of ​​the Gozohn license. These positive results span a considerable length associated with known artisanal gold mining. and are backed by a rock chip sample returning 2.6 g/t gold from identified quartz vein assemblages found throughout the area.

“We plan to begin detailed monitoring through trenching and channel sampling to identify and map in detail the sources of the gold anomalies, which could then lead to the drilling of the targeted gold anomalies.”

“We look forward to providing further updates from our active exploration programs in the two high priority Gozohn and Nimba licenses.”

Its shares are up 7.03% to 9.9p.

2:13 p.m .: Osirium Technologies sees its losses increase and plans to raise funds

Osirium Technologies PLC (AIM:OSI) fell sharply after reporting increased losses and saying it will need to raise funds later this year.

The cloud-based cybersecurity software business saw full-year bookings nearly flat at £1.6m as customers were reluctant to commit due to the uncertain economic environment.

With increased investment in its workforce and activity levels, operating losses fell from £2.87 million to £3.23 million.

It said it saw more normal customer buying patterns in the first quarter of the current fiscal year, with five new contracts signed in 2022 worth more than any contract in 2021.

But its shares fell 20% to 12p as it said it would need to raise additional capital in the second half of 2022 to “achieve its growth expectations”.

12:04 p.m .: Ranking slashes earnings forecast as casino and bingo visits drop

Rank Group (LSE:RNK) is on a losing streak as it cut its profit forecast for the year after falling visitor numbers.

It reported an increase in third quarter revenue from £48.7m to £156.4m, but pointed out that its Grosvenor and Mecca sites in the UK had been closed during the comparable period of last year due to the pandemic.

Although now fully open, both businesses saw a drop in visits late last quarter as COVID-19 cases rose again.

With that and rising costs, he now expects annual revenues of between £47m and £55m, down from a previous forecast of £55m to £65m.

He expects his performance to improve after April, but added he was uncertain about trends in the return rate of office workers in city centers and foreign customers in London towards the summer. .

Chief Executive John O’Reilly said: “The performance of our sites weakened in March, and this continued through the first weeks of the fourth quarter, impacting our current expectations for our performance across the board. the year.

“We recognize the pressures on UK consumers, but we are confident that the improvements we continue to make to the customer proposition and the investments in our sites, together with the gradual reduction in the impact of the pandemic and, with she, the return of foreign customers, position well for the coming year.”

It looks like investors aren’t willing to take the gamble just yet, and its shares are down 8.1% to 118p.

11:07 am: Ibstock boosted by strong demand and £30m buyback program

Ibstock PLC (LSE: IBST) made good progress with a strong start to the year and the launch of a £30 million share buyback programme.

The clay brick and concrete products maker said its first-quarter performance was above expectations, with strong demand in its markets.

Despite concerns about the overall economy, he expects his annual results to be slightly better than previous forecasts.

It recovered the costs of rising inflation in its clay business and, faced with soaring energy prices, it more than covered its needs for the first half, purchased around 75% of the needs for the second semester and has more than one -third cover for 2023.

Chief Executive Joe Hudson said: “We have started 2022 well, supported by robust demand in our end markets and an aggressive business approach to managing input price inflation…

“The demand for new housing and [repairs, maintenance and improvement] Markets remain robust and, while we are mindful of the broader macro uncertainties, we now expect to deliver full year performance slightly above our previous expectations.

“We are also delighted to announce a £30 million share buyback program, demonstrating our ability to deliver better returns to shareholders while continuing to invest in our future growth.”

Ibstock shares climbed 7.51% to 178.9p.

9.29am: Zenova optimistic despite £1.1m in red

Zenova Group PLC (AIM:ZED) is in demand after an upbeat trading statement despite a loss in its first year as a listed company.

The fire safety and heat management specialist was in the red at £1.1million, mainly due to research costs, testing, staff and professional fees as it establishes itself in the market.

But he said his customer base was growing well after he started marketing and selling his first products, fire protection paint, thermal insulation paint and thermal insulation plaster.

Three other products are currently in the testing phase and are expected to be released later in 2022.

He said 2022 will be a critical year for the company and it aims to be profitable by 2023.

Managing Director Tony Crawley said: “We are seeing significant global interest in our products and expect our order books to grow at an increasing rate over the next 12 months as we focus on delivering sales. in our target markets.

“Later in 2022, we plan to launch three more products in our portfolio. They provide innovative solutions that are backed by extensive testing, and they will help address today’s global heat management and safety challenges. fire.”

Its shares are up 11.33% at 16.7p, although still below July’s placement price of 19p.

8:50 a.m.: Solid State surges as it forecasts record performance

Shares of Solid State PLC (AIM:SOLI) got off to a strong start after the component supplier announced it would report record profits for the year.

After a strong end to the year, he expects revenue of around £85m, up 28% and better than City’s forecast of £80m.

Adjusted pre-tax profit is expected to be around £7.2m, compared to £6.5m expected. Its order book more than doubled to a record £85.5million.

Solid State said it posted strong performance across the group, particularly in the energy, aerospace and defense sectors.

Its electromechanical and imaging systems businesses were boosted by the acquisition of Willow Technologies and Active Silicon respectively.

On a comparable basis, organic revenue growth was above 8%, despite supply chain issues and macro challenges and the more recent conflict in Ukraine which to date has impacted negligible.

Its shares are up 12.32% at 1140p.

Elsewhere, essensys PLC (AIM:ESYS) rose despite rising losses as it issued an upbeat outlook statement.

The company, which provides software and technology for the flexible workspace and property sectors, said its half-year revenue rose 2.8% to £10.9m, while that losses had risen from £1.4m to £4.5m.

But it expects to meet market expectations for the full year, and Chief Executive Mark Furness said: “” essensys delivered a resilient performance in the first half of our fiscal year with revenue growth of 3%. revenues driven by continued strong growth in the United States.

As reported in March, while COVID-19 temporarily slowed our hiring plans, sales cycles and accelerated growth plans, we made excellent progress in product and development and in strengthening the ‘management team.

“We have seen client activity begin to increase in the second half of the year and remain confident of meeting consensus market expectations for 2022. I am also pleased to report excellent progress in Asia Pacific following the setting up our regional operations in early 2022 with the sales pipeline now building strongly.

“As the impacts of Covid-19 begin to subside, work patterns are beginning to settle and our flexible workspace operator customers are reporting increased demand. As a result, large flexible operators are beginning to focus again on expansion, driven by positive long-term market momentum Landlords’ business plans around providing flexible spaces are becoming more visible and companies’ use of more flexible workspaces is becoming more and more obvious.

“These structural drivers underpin our strong pipeline for 2023 and 2024 and the board’s confidence in essensys’ plan to seize its expanding market opportunity.”

The bullish tone helped push its shares up 13.61% to 96p.

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Pentagon Says Russia Conducts ‘Shaping’ Operations https://westielovers.com/pentagon-says-russia-conducts-shaping-operations/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 01:06:30 +0000 https://westielovers.com/pentagon-says-russia-conducts-shaping-operations/ Russia continues to build capabilities in south and east, Pentagon says Russia is “shaping and setting the conditions for future offensive operations” in southern and eastern Ukraine, according to the Pentagon. Russian forces continue to provide more combat capabilities in the Donbass, including artillery, helicopters and command and control assets, Pentagon press secretary John Kirby […]]]>

Russia continues to build capabilities in south and east, Pentagon says

Russia is “shaping and setting the conditions for future offensive operations” in southern and eastern Ukraine, according to the Pentagon.

Russian forces continue to provide more combat capabilities in the Donbass, including artillery, helicopters and command and control assets, Pentagon press secretary John Kirby said at the press conference. daily.

More than 10 battalion tactical groups were also added to reinforce Russian combat units already present in southern and eastern Ukraine as Russian airstrikes and artillery concentrated in Mariupol.

The southern city has yet to fall, Kirby said, despite aerial “pounding” and long-range fires.

Ukrainian forces continue to resist and “bravely” defend Mariupol and secure the cities of Donbass, Kirby said.

Despite heavy losses in recent weeks, Kirby said Russia still has the majority of its assembled combat power.

Kirby said Russia was trying to learn from its mistakes in northern Ukraine. He said Russian forces were still struggling with logistical support and control and command issues.

The appointment of a new general to overall command in Ukraine indicates that Russia is trying to make efforts to improve command and be more effective in its attacks, Kirby added.

As the bombardment continues, the United States believes that Russia “is still grappling with many of these issues.”

The United States will begin training Ukrainian military instructors on 15 American Howitzer artillery systems “in the coming days,” Kirby said.

The training will take place outside Ukraine and will include a small number of Ukrainians who will then train other forces inside the country. Kirby said the training “won’t take very long.”

Kirby also said the United States could not yet confirm that Russian forces hit Western weapons stockpiles near Lviv.

Russia reported that its forces destroyed an arms depot near Lviv that was used for “large shipments” of arms supplied to Ukraine by the United States and Europe.

Kirby said the United States was still reviewing combat damage assessments of targets and hits, but said there was no indication at this time if Western aid was the target or had been damaged or destroyed.

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Ramadan for Palestinians living in Israel: 85-year-old refugee serves as unique role model https://westielovers.com/ramadan-for-palestinians-living-in-israel-85-year-old-refugee-serves-as-unique-role-model/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 21:37:27 +0000 https://westielovers.com/ramadan-for-palestinians-living-in-israel-85-year-old-refugee-serves-as-unique-role-model/ DUBAI: Across Iraq, water sources that have been taken for granted and relied upon through centuries of hardship, chaos and drought are under threat. The same is true for the livelihoods of many people in the country who find themselves facing unprecedented challenges in accessing one of life’s essential resources. A combination of conflict, corruption, […]]]>

DUBAI: Across Iraq, water sources that have been taken for granted and relied upon through centuries of hardship, chaos and drought are under threat. The same is true for the livelihoods of many people in the country who find themselves facing unprecedented challenges in accessing one of life’s essential resources.

A combination of conflict, corruption, mismanagement and regional political disputes has left the people of Iraq facing chronic water shortages that have serious effects on agriculture, the economy and the health of its citizens, so much so that the viability of many communities is now in question.

Over the past five years, Baghdad residents have grown accustomed to the sight of islands of land jutting out along the Tigris River, where only its mighty waters were visible. It is a phenomenon associated with rivers in which water levels have dropped to record lows due to decreasing volumes.

As a result, a number of barren islands now dot the surface of one of the world’s most legendary waterways as it winds gently through the Iraqi capital, a shadow of the swift, green torrent that helped sustain the ancient land through the ages.

Salam, who only gave his first name, is a taxi driver who has lived in Baghdad all his life. In years past, he watched the Tiger roar through the city, but he said its flow had diminished over the years and he could now see the narrow bed of the river.

“I’m doing better than most in the rest of Iraq,” he told Arab News. “My water costs are still relatively affordable, but I have to buy a lot of drinking water for cooking because I cannot use tap water, which is far too contaminated.”

He has friends and relatives in Diyala, in central-eastern Iraq, and for them it’s a different story.

“My farmer friends are in trouble, so I often lend them money to get by. May God help them,” he explained.

In southern Iraq, where the Tigris and Euphrates rivers meet to empty into the fabulous Mesopotamian marshes, buffaloes drink from stagnant pools of polluted water and farmers paddle traditional canoes through what was once pure drinking water but now looks more like industrial sludge.

The livelihoods of millions of people are at risk as shrinking rivers compound the effects of low rainfall and heat waves in Iraq. (AFP)

Freshwater supplies to once mighty rivers have been restricted at their sources by dams built in Turkey, which have blocked much of the Euphrates and Tigris flowing into Syria and Iraq.

The two rivers supply 98% of Iraq’s surface water. Other sources of water have been dammed in Iran, meaning the once reliable volumes of water that staved off starvation and disease, even during years of extreme drought, are now a long way off. guaranteed.

In 2018, the UN ranked Iraq fifth in the world in terms of nations’ vulnerability to climate change. The effects have been clear over the past 15 years, with lower rainfall and longer, hotter heat waves becoming more frequent.

Studies by the Iraqi government reveal that the country is now about 40% desert and that the salinity of much of the land is too high for agriculture.

In recent years in southern Iraq, water has covered just 30% of what was once marshland, but it has now been replaced by dry, cracked earth, a sight that locals weren’t unaware of. accustomed.

The effects of climate change are tangible: the 2020-21 winter season was one of the driest on record in Iraq, marked by a reduction in water flow of 29% in the Tigris and 73% in the Euphrates . Rainfall has been increasingly sporadic over the past 20 years.

QUICKREALITIES

* Iraq’s population of 40 million is expected to double by 2050.

* The Tigris and Euphrates provide 98% of Iraq’s surface waters.

* Precipitation is expected to drop by 25% by 2050.

* More than half of the arable land is threatened by salinization.

For now, however, regional water policy is a more pressing issue. Finding ways to coerce Ankara and Tehran into allowing Iraqi rivers to flow more freely is a challenge Iraqi officials are concerned about.

Towards the end of 2021, Mahdi Rashid Al-Hamdani, Iraq’s Minister of Water Resources, announced that he planned to file a complaint against Iran for cutting off the water supply at the border and causing a disaster in the province. from Diyala. Iraqi authorities said their country received only a tenth of an agreed quota. Meanwhile, the amount of water coming from Turkey has decreased by almost two-thirds in recent years.

A report released last year by the Norwegian Refugee Council, titled Iraq’s drought crisis, found that many farmers have gone into debt to try to keep their livestock alive. He also revealed that one in two families in drought-affected areas needed food aid. At least seven million Iraqis are affected by the ongoing drought.

A tractor plows a plot of agricultural land on the outskirts of the town of Tel Keppe (Tel Kaif) north of the city of Mosul in the province of Nineveh, northern Iraq. (AFP/file photo)

Farmers urgently need drought-resistant seeds and additional feed for their cattle, goats and sheep to avoid further livestock losses, according to Caroline Zullo, Iraq Advocacy Advisor at the Norwegian Council for the refugees.

In the longer term, irrigation infrastructure for farmers needs to be established or rehabilitated, alongside improved water resource management plans at local and national levels, Zullo told Arab News.

The effects of the drought in the governorates have been significant, including crop and livestock losses, greater barriers to access to food, lower incomes, and drought-induced displacement of vulnerable families.

The effect of water scarcity on children, even in built-up urban areas, has long been a cause for concern. A 2021 UNICEF report titled Running Dry said nearly three out of five children in Iraq do not have access to safely managed water. Many households have been forced to dig wells to obtain water that is not safe to drink and in some cases unsanitary even for necessities such as laundry and laundry.

Water quality in the southern city of Basra is among the worst in the country, according to numerous studies. A 2018 report by Human Rights Watch titled Basra is thirsty said that at least 118,000 people had been hospitalized in recent months with symptoms related to sanitation and water quality issues. At the time, Basra’s health directorate urged people to boil water before drinking it.

The effects of water shortages on demography in Iraq are evidenced by the thousands of people fleeing urban areas to the outskirts of major cities, which in turn struggle to meet the needs of their newcomers.

In the Kurdish north of the country, heavy snowfall in the mountains in January has offered respite so far this year. As winter turns to spring, the thaw will help replenish reservoirs and prevent water shortages before the onset of another fierce summer, where temperatures in Anbar province and deep within the country s ‘Traditionally set in the 40 degrees Celsius between May and mid-September.

Iraq’s central government remains weak and therefore no match for powerful neighbors at the negotiating table. Five months after a national election, the country is still a long way from choosing a new president and prime minister or forming a government. If and when the political stalemate ends, a weak and cantankerous government will still need international support to deal with a big challenge like water security.

Rahman Khani, head of the Kurdish Regional Government’s water resources and dams department at the agriculture ministry, said outdated methods are hampering the country’s water management systems.

“We also suffer from pollution and traditional irrigation methods,” he told Arab News. “The solution is to reform internal water management, build dams and use modern irrigation technologies, in addition to pressuring neighboring countries to release good amounts of shared water” .

Looking ahead, experts say more needs to be done to help Iraq’s most vulnerable people.

“With drought conditions expected to continue and even worsen, farming communities are at risk of further crop failures, which could lead to more displacement if no action is taken,” Zullo told Arab News.

However, as winter gives way to warmer weather, it is very likely that Iraqis will be hungrier and thirstier this summer than ever before.

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Russians recognize a new approach to working with Africa https://westielovers.com/russians-recognize-a-new-approach-to-working-with-africa/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 15:17:53 +0000 https://westielovers.com/russians-recognize-a-new-approach-to-working-with-africa/ The World Entrepreneurs Investment Forum (WEIF 2022) came to a close in Dubai on Wednesday with the adoption by participants of the “UAE Declaration”, which calls for greater collaboration, integration and connectivity across the Arab world and a strong focus on women entrepreneurs to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. Youth and […]]]>

The World Entrepreneurs Investment Forum (WEIF 2022) came to a close in Dubai on Wednesday with the adoption by participants of the “UAE Declaration”, which calls for greater collaboration, integration and connectivity across the Arab world and a strong focus on women entrepreneurs to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

Youth and Innovation was the highlight of the Forum’s closing ceremony, with the announcement of the three big winners of the “Arab Gathering” for Entrepreneurship and Innovation. The entrepreneurship competition for university students from the Arab region was held on the sidelines of WEIF 2022.

Sustainable development through entrepreneurship

The closing day of WEIF 2022 saw participants, partners and co-sponsors, including the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO)-ITPO, as well as the Arab League, Arab Chambers of Commerce, Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Bahrain and the Government of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) expresses its strong commitment to achieving the 17 global goals set out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Furthermore, the UAE Declaration stated: “We recognize that entrepreneurship and innovation are the engine for creating jobs, driving economic growth and realizing social gains; We recommend that all efforts be focused on achieving sustainable development through entrepreneurship and innovation that can be achieved through strong, inclusive, sustainable and resilient economic growth.

Summarizing the three-day Forum, Dr. Hashim Hussein, Executive Director of WEIF, said, “This is the closing session. But WEIF never closes. Every WEIF we have a statement to summarize what happened. This year, the declaration is read by an African and Arab entrepreneur because this year, this global forum focuses on the Arab region and Africa.

“We are here connecting minds and brains, under the umbrella of the Arab League.”

Gender parity “a must” for entrepreneurship

Forum participants paid particular attention to empowering women at all economic levels to achieve the SDGs through innovation and entrepreneurship. “We encourage the active participation of women in all sectors through entrepreneurship and innovation,” reads the Declaration.

Emphasis was also placed on the need to develop and implement sound economic policies, legislation and programs as important strategies for sustainable development and to ensure the empowerment of women at the national, regional levels. and global.

The Declaration also highlighted the need to build strong partnerships between entrepreneurs – women and men – to share best practices in linking financial and non-financial services that could improve the challenges of entrepreneurs and strengthen micro-small businesses. and medium enterprises. (MSME).

Addressing the closing session, Ahmed Aboul Gheit, Secretary General of the League of Arab States, said that the young men and women of Arab countries, who numbered over 100 million, are the backbone of the Arab region.

He also stressed the importance of providing an environment conducive to the success of young Arabs, “because their success means the success of the Arab nation and society.”

Mr. Gheit detailed three pieces of advice for young people in the Arab region: “First, work until the last moment of your life; second, read until you become blind; and third, have hope that your aspirations will come true.

The way forward and the role of UNIDO

The UAE Declaration also called for exploring and developing new investment sectors, namely “green” and renewable energy, blue economy, “orange” (creative) economy, putting the emphasis on commerce and heritage, special programs and initiatives that economically empower people with disabilities.

Increase synergies between governments, private sector, philanthropists, civil society, financial institutions, think tanks, universities, schools, chambers, non-governmental organizations, media and international organizations to cooperate to facilitate the promotion of resilient entrepreneurs and innovative businesses towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals were also highlighted.

UNIDO’s role in promoting inclusive and sustainable industrial development and the considerable achievements of previous editions of the WEIF were also commended.

UNIDO Director General for Programs and Partnerships Ciyong Zou said, “I am delighted to see this great innovation and breakthrough taking place at WEIF. As you all know, post-COVID events play a crucial role in economic growth and WEIF has seen how we can build resilience to help the global economy grow and thrive. Yet, at the same time, we must work collectively to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

The Declaration urged the international community, the United Nations, UNIDO and other relevant international and regional organizations, think tanks, civil society, among other stakeholders, to take the recommendations into account when developing their policies and strategies to support entrepreneurship and innovation for sustainable development. development.

Support young entrepreneurs and innovation

The ceremony ended in excitement with the announcement of the winners of the second Arab Rally for Innovation.
The competition targeted university students from the Arab region and involved 20 teams from across the region.
University students and professors have worked hard to find innovative solutions to many of the challenges facing the region, in areas such as water, agriculture, renewable energy, environmental pollution and waste recycling. environmental waste.
The first prize was awarded to a Syrian company called BEVOL, which designed an unprecedented and interactive international social media platform to promote the culture of volunteerism and improve the performance of social responsibility using motivational means.

Second place went to WALTER from Palestine, which is a company providing technological solutions for gray water treatment to reduce water consumption in public and private facilities. The company’s special water treatment system is based on gray water filtration, implicit storage and treatment to be ready for later pumping to the toilet.

The third winner was CLOUD, a company that offers a disposable menstrual pad that respects body, mind and nature, using 100% healthy, organic and biodegradable materials.

The impact of the Forum

Over the years, WEIF has supported these young entrepreneurs on their journey to becoming business leaders.

Addressing the gathering, the winner of last year’s Arab Rally, Wadah Malaeb of Lebanon, said the competition had helped him grow and put him on the world map.

“In 2019, I won the Arab Innovation Rally, which [led to] a decisive change in my career. Since then, we have patented our technology, expanded our team, set up the manufacturing plant for our chips. We have established collaborations with academia, with the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Beirut,” he explained.

He went on to say, “We are now expanding, giving different organ and disease models on our chips to create a human model on which to test drugs. We have entered into conversations with pharmaceutical companies like AstraZeneca to set up studies to introduce our concept into the drug discovery process.

Mr. Malaeb won the top prize for his unique invention: Ductal Organoid-on-a-Chip, based on growing organ chip technology. The chip provides an environment in which cells can grow and reorganize into tissue mimicking the human body, providing the ideal atmosphere for performing drug tests efficiently and saving money and human hardship.

About WEIF

The World Entrepreneurs Investment Forum (WEIF), through its secretariat at UNIDO ITPO/AICEI Bahrain and various partners, has successfully positioned itself as a leading knowledge pavilion on entrepreneurship, innovation and high impact investments.

During the previous editions of the Forum in 2015, 2017 and 2019, WEIF was able to achieve significant milestones and become the main dedicated Entrepreneurs Investment Forum by the United Nations system.

WEIF’s main theme Achieving the SDGs through entrepreneurship, innovation and investment has been a crucial factor in its success.

WEIF 2022, which opened at the Expo Pavilion in Dubai on Monday, March 28, focused on what is needed at the level of governments, multinational organizations and the private sector to achieve entrepreneurial resilience and economy after COVID-19 in the Arab region, Africa and the world.

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What happens when we coat strawberries with nanoparticles? https://westielovers.com/what-happens-when-we-coat-strawberries-with-nanoparticles/ Mon, 04 Apr 2022 15:50:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/what-happens-when-we-coat-strawberries-with-nanoparticles/ An article published in the journal Polymers investigated the use of nanoparticles to extend the shelf life of strawberries. The research was carried out by scientists from Al-Azar University in Egypt and Taif University in Saudi Arabia. Study: Impact of starch coating incorporated with silver nanoparticles on storage time of strawberries. Image Credit: MarcoFood/Shutterstock.com Post-harvest […]]]>

An article published in the journal Polymers investigated the use of nanoparticles to extend the shelf life of strawberries. The research was carried out by scientists from Al-Azar University in Egypt and Taif University in Saudi Arabia.

Study: Impact of starch coating incorporated with silver nanoparticles on storage time of strawberries. Image Credit: MarcoFood/Shutterstock.com

Post-harvest problems with fruit

Fresh fruit is an essential part of a healthy diet, providing several essential vitamins and minerals. However, after harvest, the quality of soft fruits such as strawberries in particular can deteriorate very quickly. Rapid softening and decomposition pose storage and consumption problems. Fungal infections of strawberries occur frequently during storage, and their fragile tissues make post-harvest handling difficult.

Transportation and storage can affect soft fruit quality due to physical damage and physiological processes. Loss of nutrients, water, color and textural changes can occur, which makes the fruit unattractive and can lead to lower prices and sales volumes, and therefore economic loss for growers, manufacturers and retailers.

Size, shape and distribution of starch-silver particles examined using TEM. Image credit: Taha, IM et al., Polymers

Strategies to improve the quality of delicate fruits

Several strategies can be used to maintain the quality and nutritional profile of delicate foods, including quick freezing methods. Another method that can be employed is to coat the surface of the fruits with various biodegradable and non-toxic substances to protect them against environmental factors.

A biodegradable polymer, starch is found in plants. This polysaccharide is non-toxic, inexpensive and abundant, making it an ideal material for coating fruits. However, due to its limited flexibility and brittleness, processing starch can be difficult.

In recent research, the addition of nanoparticles to coatings has been explored to improve their properties. Their ability to protect against microbial activity has been established by numerous studies. These nanoparticles can be prepared using physical and chemical methods and for many decades silver nanoparticles have been used as food additives and materials used for food contact.

Uses of food colors containing silver nanoparticles include chocolate and confectionery coatings and liqueur additives. In some countries, however, the use of silver directly or in food contact materials is restricted or prohibited. The EU, for example, has classified it as a suspect additive. The US FDA, on the other hand, has authorized its use.

In recent years, several new applications have been explored using silver nanoparticles. They have been proposed as an alternative to sulfur dioxide because of the health risks of sulfides, or to increase the antimicrobial properties of this substance. Silver nanoparticles have also been studied as functional ingredients to provide anti-caking properties and to clarify liquids. Several studies have investigated how silver nanoparticles can improve food quality and shelf life.

DPPH free radical scavenging activity (%) of St-AgNPs relative to ascorbic acid.

DPPH free radical scavenging activity (%) of St-AgNPs relative to ascorbic acid. Image credit: Taha, IM et al., Polymers

The study

The article published in Polymers used strawberries as a food model to investigate how coating fruits with nanoparticles can help improve their quality and shelf life. Differences in shelf life of untreated and treated strawberries were examined, as well as differences in physical, microbiological and chemical properties. The authors synthesized and characterized several silver nanoparticles in the study.

Nanoparticle coatings were prepared from a solution of starch and silver nitrate. Ethanol was used to precipitate the nanoparticles, this precipitate being washed to remove by-products and unreacted components, then separated, dried and characterized. The characterization methods used in the research were TEM, FTIR and UV-Vis analysis. In addition, the antioxidant activity was characterized by the authors and compared to ascorbic acid.

Analysis of the effect of the washing process on the removal of silver by the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES).

Analysis of the effect of the washing process on the removal of silver by the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Image credit: Taha, IM et al., Polymers

The fruits were selected on the basis of the same size and the absence of damage and fungal infection. They were then coated with the new nanoparticles and glycerol was used as a plasticizer. A dipping method was used to coat the fruit samples. The samples were then stored both at room temperature and under refrigerated conditions. Samples stored at room temperature were tested every other day, with refrigerated samples tested every four days until the fruit deteriorated.

Quality criteria were assessed including weight loss, soluble solids content, visual degradation, anthocyanin content and microbial count. The number of days they remained marketable was used to assess the shelf life of nanoparticle-coated strawberries. Some results of the study analyzes indicated good antioxidant activity, reduced weight loss in coated samples, lower proportion of visual spoilage, reduced microbial activity, and significantly increased shelf life of coated strawberries. The effect of washing was also studied.

The new coating process offers significant advantages for post-harvest handling and storage of delicate fruits such as strawberries, and is a low-cost, simple, fast, non-toxic and environmentally safe strategy. The authors said this technology should be encouraged for use in food processing and packaging.

Further reading

Taha, IM et al. (2022) Impact of starch coating incorporated with silver nanoparticles on storage time of strawberries [online] Polymers 14(7) 1439 | mdpi.com. Available at: https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4360/14/7/1439

Disclaimer: The views expressed herein are those of the author expressed privately and do not necessarily represent the views of AZoM.com Limited T/A AZoNetwork, the owner and operator of this website. This disclaimer forms part of the terms of use of this website.

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193 on this pitch should have been hunted, says MI skipper Rohit Sharma https://westielovers.com/193-on-this-pitch-should-have-been-hunted-says-mi-skipper-rohit-sharma/ Sat, 02 Apr 2022 16:01:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/193-on-this-pitch-should-have-been-hunted-says-mi-skipper-rohit-sharma/ Mumbai Indians skipper Rohit Sharma believes his side should have chased a 194 goal against Rajasthan Royals on a good track after suffering their second loss in as many games at the start of the Indian Premier League. MI lost by 23 runs and the absence of injured senior hitter Suryakumar Yadav […]]]>

Mumbai Indians skipper Rohit Sharma believes his side should have chased a 194 goal against Rajasthan Royals on a good track after suffering their second loss in as many games at the start of the Indian Premier League.

MI lost by 23 runs and the absence of injured senior hitter Suryakumar Yadav was noticeable.

However, skipper Rohit said they wouldn’t risk playing him unless he fully recovered from his hand injury.

“I thought they hit well to get to 193. Buttler played outstanding innings, we tried everything to get him out. But I thought 193 on that ground could have been chased, especially when we needed 70 in 7 overs. But these things can happen and its early days. We can learn,” Rohit said at the post-match presentation ceremony.

However, the skipper noted the positives of the game.

“Little,” he said, adding, “Bumrah bowls well. Mills do too. And Tilak played exceptionally. And Ishan’s stick was terrific. I thought one of those two hitters up ‘in the end would have made the difference.’

However, the skipper didn’t commit when asked if Surya is available for the next match.

“He’s a key player for us. Once he’s fit he comes straight in but we want him to recover because finger injuries are tricky.

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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