Visible Economic Issues – Westie Lovers http://westielovers.com/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 05:51:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://westielovers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-icon-32x32.png Visible Economic Issues – Westie Lovers http://westielovers.com/ 32 32 BNEF, Energy News, ET EnergyWorld https://westielovers.com/bnef-energy-news-et-energyworld/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 03:45:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/bnef-energy-news-et-energyworld/ New Delhi: Steel production could be achieved with almost zero carbon emissions thanks to an additional $ 278 billion in investment by 2050, according to a new report from research firm BloombergNEF (BNEF). According to the report titled “Decarbonizing Steel: A Net-Zero Pathway”, by 2050, green hydrogen could be the cheapest method of producing steel […]]]>
New Delhi: Steel production could be achieved with almost zero carbon emissions thanks to an additional $ 278 billion in investment by 2050, according to a new report from research firm BloombergNEF (BNEF).

According to the report titled “Decarbonizing Steel: A Net-Zero Pathway”, by 2050, green hydrogen could be the cheapest method of producing steel and capture 31% of the market.

“Another 45% could come from recycled materials and the rest from a combination of old coal-fired power plants equipped with carbon capture systems and innovative processes using electricity to refine iron ore into iron and steel”, did he declare.

The report added that it would be a radical change in the type of furnaces and fuels used to produce steel.

Today, about 70 percent of steel is made in coal-fired blast furnaces, 25 percent is produced from scrap metal in electric furnaces, and 5 percent is made in a newer process, usually fired with gas. natural, known as DRI, or direct reduction. iron.

Converting a significant portion of the fleet to hydrogen would require more DRI factories and more electric furnaces. Blast furnace production would fall to 18% of capacity in this scenario.

The report says hydrogen and recycling will play a central role in reducing emissions from steel production. Steel is responsible for around 7 percent of human-made greenhouse gas emissions each year and is one of the most polluting industries in the world.

“The steel industry cannot afford to wait until the 2040s to begin its transition,” said Julia Attwood, responsible for sustainable materials at BNEF and lead author of the report.

Attwood added that the next 10 years could see a massive expansion in steel capacity to meet demand in growing economies, like India.

“The new factories of today are the renovations of tomorrow. The commissioning of power plants fueled by natural gas could allow producers to have one of the cheapest capacity by adapting them to burn hydrogen in the 2030s and 2040s, ”she said.

She added, however, that continuing to build new coal-fired power plants would leave producers with poor options towards a net zero future by 2050.

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Cinema meets the environment at IFFI https://westielovers.com/cinema-meets-the-environment-at-iffi/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 05:13:01 +0000 https://westielovers.com/cinema-meets-the-environment-at-iffi/ Films such as Taledanda, Koozhangal, Semkhor seize the opportunity to highlight a range of environmental issues facing humanity today. A still from the Tamil movie Pebbles. The 52sd edition of the Indian International Film Festival (IFFI) held in Panjim, Goa was marked by films used as a medium to highlight a range of environmental issues […]]]>

Films such as Taledanda, Koozhangal, Semkhor seize the opportunity to highlight a range of environmental issues facing humanity today.

A still from the Tamil movie Pebbles.

The 52sd edition of the Indian International Film Festival (IFFI) held in Panjim, Goa was marked by films used as a medium to highlight a range of environmental issues that concern humanity today.

That cinema can play a central role in helping to reclaim the environment is now realized by many filmmakers who have stood up for the cause of transforming society and the world into a better place.

The nine-day event is Asia’s oldest and India’s largest film festival. Many films were screened from November 20 to 28.

The change was clearly visible at IFFI since its 50e edition held in 2019, which featured environmentally focused films like Manju Borah’s In the land of poisoned women, Bohubritta, Hellaro and Jallikattu.

Also this year, inspiring films and documentaries have sought to draw attention to critical environmental issues through gripping storytelling. What better way to promote and present such thematic films than at national and international film festivals.

The film Kannada by Praveen Krupakar Taledanda – starring Sanchari Vijay, MangalaN., Chaitra Achar and Ramesh Pandit – was screened at IFFI 2021. The film had its world premiere in the Indian Panorama (feature) section of the film festival.

Taledanda is an attempt to awaken humans from the sleep of greed which causes destruction of the environment and is set to affect future generations. The film portrays the life of an intellectually disabled person from the Soliga Kunnegowda alias Kunna tribe, the protagonist played by the late Sanchari Vijay, who lives with his mother in a tribal camp.

Kunna inherits her deep love for nature from her father who also passed on a wealth of traditional knowledge to her about the many medicinal qualities of the trees and plants in the region. The forest is his home and family, and where possible Kunna plants saplings throughout the forest.

A local politician manipulates government officials to get approval to cut down trees in the village to build a road under the pretext of development. Kunna begins to have visions of the goddess Attilakamma, the mother of forests, being attacked by humans.

A disturbed Kunna goes out of his way to stop the logging and, in the process, even finds himself in a scuffle with government officials and ends up in a legal mess.

A still from the kannada film Taledanda.

Despite his best efforts, including sending a message to the Chief Minister informing him of the situation in his village, as the tree felling does not stop, a disappointed Kunna gives life.

Director Praveen Krupakar said: “We have destroyed 50% of nature and ecology in the past 100 years. I have witnessed a disabled friend’s love for nature for over 30 years and it inspired me to make this film. Climate change is real and not imaginary as some of us would like to believe. If this story even reaches 0.1% of the audience, I would think I did my job.

Tamil director PS Vinothraj’s Koozhangal (Cailloux) screened at IFFI 2021 in the Indian Panorama section (feature film) starred Chellapandi and Karuththadaiyaan. It is modeled on the rugged terrain of southern Tamil Nadu. The film was nominated for the Gandhi ICFT-UNESCO Medal at IFFI 2021.

It is also India’s official entry for the 2022 Oscars.

The film depicts a journey taken by Ganapathy, an alcoholic and violent man whose wife ran away after being beaten. In order to bring her back, Ganapathy sets off with their Hairy son on a difficult journey through extremely harsh terrain, marked by arid lands, scorching heat, and scarcity of water.

They feel the fury of nature as they walk in an arid area, in scorching heat. It gets them to confront their emotions. Ultimately, their hunger and anger are ultimately satisfied by the “nurturing nature of women”.

The director was inspired for the film by an incident in his sister’s life.

“I shot the film in my own village because history and the landscape were important to me. The landscape depicted in the film forms the third character because the behavior of human beings is also influenced by the climate and the geography of their place of life. The arid landscape and the scorching sun in which the whole plot takes place are an important element conditioning the behavior of the characters, ”said the director.

Special mention is the opening film of the Indian Panorama section of IFFI 2021, the debut film by Assamese actor Aimee Baruah. Semkhor. Through her film, the director tried to portray the life of the Samsa community in Semkhor in Assam.

The film is the first Dimasa language film to be screened at IFFI. The Samsa people live very close to nature and avoid everything modern.

The actor-director, through Semkhor, attempted to dismiss superstitions associated with the nature-loving community known to go to extreme lengths to maintain its ethnicity while remaining socially isolated, even largely misunderstood by the rest.


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EDITORIAL: Holidays are an opportunity to help others | Editorials https://westielovers.com/editorial-holidays-are-an-opportunity-to-help-others-editorials/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 05:15:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/editorial-holidays-are-an-opportunity-to-help-others-editorials/ As we clean Thanksgiving leftovers from our fridges and head into Christmas, the American vibe right now is probably more “bah, humbug” than “goodwill to men!” “ COVID-19 appears to have had a demoralizing fourth wind, with cases increasing in western Pennsylvania and other parts of the country. Inflation has eaten away at consumers’ wallets […]]]>

As we clean Thanksgiving leftovers from our fridges and head into Christmas, the American vibe right now is probably more “bah, humbug” than “goodwill to men!” “

COVID-19 appears to have had a demoralizing fourth wind, with cases increasing in western Pennsylvania and other parts of the country. Inflation has eaten away at consumers’ wallets more than at any time in the past 30 years, and the country is perhaps even more fiercely divided than it was just a few years ago. The grim provision has pounded President Biden’s approval numbers despite the legislative success of his infrastructure package.

On the bright side, smart money has most of our current difficulties which are temporary. The coronavirus will eventually go away, although there is room to worry about further mutations and how much illness and death the world will endure. Several economists have argued convincingly that this surge in inflation looks less like the soaring inflation of the 1970s and more like the inflation that followed the end of World War II, as the country demobilized and demand consumer repression was unleashed. The global supply chain issues that were hampering the flow of goods will eventually be resolved. There are reasons to believe that the overall economic situation will improve in the coming months.

Nonetheless, COVID-19 and rising prices have exacerbated the woes that many people are experiencing. Families who were already struggling have to pay even more for basic necessities. As we enter this season of giving and giving, those who can afford it may want to lend a hand to the many nonprofits in the area through donating money, time or money. expertise.

From Thanksgiving Day until Christmas, the Observer-Rapporteur and the Herald-Standard will spotlight nonprofits in a series called “Helping the Helpers”. Readers will be able to find out what these organizations need and how they can help them. In Thursday’s edition, editor Karen Mansfield looked at The Salvation Army and how individuals can help this venerable organization by participating in seasonal efforts like distributing Christmas gifts to children, the participation in the Christmas Basket of Hope or the Red Kettle campaign, which is the most visible of all Salvation Army efforts.

Captain Amber Imhoff of the Salvation Army Corps in Washington explained, “We definitely need volunteers year round. We try to do good in our community and for our community throughout the year, but it’s a busy time for us.

Imhoff also pointed out that there are many ways people can help.

“Maybe you can’t stand up and ring a bell because of work commitments or a health problem, but you can hang door hangers for the red kettle, or maybe you can’t can’t help financially, but you can assemble a bike or load cars for our Christmas distribution, ”she said.

Lending a helping hand will benefit the entire community this holiday season. It could also help a lot of us get past that “bah, humbug” mood.

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Why are large companies considering switching to new age ERPs ?, IT News, ET CIO https://westielovers.com/why-are-large-companies-considering-switching-to-new-age-erps-it-news-et-cio/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 03:16:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/why-are-large-companies-considering-switching-to-new-age-erps-it-news-et-cio/ By Dhrumil Dhakan ERP solutions today are accelerating rapidly and also offering uniqueness through innovations brought by artificial intelligence, data analytics, user experience and automation. These changes benefit companies by giving them increased visibility and flexibility in terms of resources, and next-generation ERP solutions also help increase organizational efficiency. During a panel discussion on building […]]]>
By Dhrumil Dhakan

ERP solutions today are accelerating rapidly and also offering uniqueness through innovations brought by artificial intelligence, data analytics, user experience and automation. These changes benefit companies by giving them increased visibility and flexibility in terms of resources, and next-generation ERP solutions also help increase organizational efficiency.

During a panel discussion on building a future-ready business on a modern ERP, industry leaders shared their views on the biggest trends in modern ERP and how which it helps to shape the operations of the company.

Abhijit Katkar, Partner, Deloitte India believes that the definition of ERP deserves to be revisited today, stating: “In the digital age, the avatar in which organizations implement ERP and speak or mean ERP is very different from what it was before. So, I’m just going to share some trends from what I see from my perspective, advising and working with multiple clients across the world and industries.

Katkar believes that while the fundamental requirements, in terms of improving operational efficiency, providing data for decision-making, etc., remain the same, there is a fundamental change in the way that organizations extract value from ERP investments.

“In this context, I clearly want to talk about three or four mega-trends that I see, the first trend that I see is hyper-connectivity. So today we are building systems not just for our business, but for a larger ecosystem. When we talk about ERP today we mean enterprise ERP extended to our ecosystem partners and others and this is only possible because today’s ERP offers open architecture, APIs and endless connectivity possibilities using the world’s IoTs and OTs, ”he said,“ Today the idea is not to implement ERP just for the business, but essentially orchestrating a system design using multiple components or ERP solutions that support business needs. ”

The second trend Katkar mentioned is hyper-automation. He says that while in the past ERP was used to provide data or reporting requirements, today ERP is used to help the business meet its future needs by providing analytics.

The third trend observed in the ERP world is continuous improvement, he adds: “Today, the way modern ERPs are sort of freeing themselves is continuous improvement. There is an incremental but continuous update and functionality of functionalities, an enrichment of the ERP.

Speaking on the latest trend, he said, “The latest trend I want to talk about, which is very relevant in the cloud context in particular, may be related to external factors but there is a greater geographic location. of the regulations. What I mean by this is that there are regulations around privacy, data residency, and data ownership that are emerging and contrasting sharply with the concept of the cloud.

While there have been significant changes in modern ERP, it is important to see if it copes with the dynamic changes in the business environment. Ashish Desai, VP, IT & CIO, Aditya Birla Group thinks the answer to this question is twofold.

He thinks today’s ERP is more focused on the business aspects of the business, adding that “the futuristic demand of business is how can I leverage real-time data.”

“So the need for the business in the future is how can we get everything from ERP in real time? How can I use the data for real-time analysis? How to use this data to provide information in real time or use this data for hyper customer journey maps? How can we integrate OP systems with ERP that can help us improve productivity and at the same time analyze in real time, ”Desai said.

Dinesh Talniya, CIO, APL Apollo Tubes believes that at this time, ERPs should not be run on their own. “ERP, you will call it an autonomous system for the internal organization. While the organization nowadays has become a kind of integrated organization that consists of customers, suppliers, other stakeholders and ERP does not function as a common tool for all, ERP serves to maintain and running the business internet, that’s what ERP is from now on, ”said Talniya questioning whether the company’s current business priorities are up to the standards. technological stacks already present in the organization.

Jagdish Kumar, Group President and CFO, Anand Auto shared his thoughts on how ERP systems contribute to the financial transformation of the organization, stating: “As a user of the system, there are two aspects to ERP, one is very clear that ERP alone today is limited and the reason I say this is that over the years we have seen multiple implementations and as the world changes too quickly, LES in themselves are, to a certain extent, rigid and because of the rigidity, there is a way to go. As soon as you say you want things to be more flexible, then you see the cost of implementation soar.

The second aspect, according to Kumar, was the interfaces present. He elaborated on this point, stating that they are driven more broadly. “Things change so quickly in the real world, especially in India, given the saturated demands and stuff, sometimes it seems like the rigidity comes in the way it works. “

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RIL Framework, Energy News, ET EnergyWorld https://westielovers.com/ril-framework-energy-news-et-energyworld/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 02:02:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/ril-framework-energy-news-et-energyworld/ Sambalpur: IIM Sambalpur’s main business conclave guest Kapil Maheshwari said on Saturday that most mainstream businesses are now committing to a “net zero” strategy to tackle climate change. Net zero refers to the balance between the amount of greenhouse gases produced and the amount removed from the atmosphere. Speaking at the Sixth Annual “Marmagya 6.0” […]]]>
Sambalpur: IIM Sambalpur’s main business conclave guest Kapil Maheshwari said on Saturday that most mainstream businesses are now committing to a “net zero” strategy to tackle climate change. Net zero refers to the balance between the amount of greenhouse gases produced and the amount removed from the atmosphere.

Speaking at the Sixth Annual “Marmagya 6.0” Business Conclave hosted by IIM Sambalpur, Maheshwari said that “Producing future profits while respecting the environment is the way forward”.

Kapil Maheshwari is President of Renewable Energy Ecosystem Development and Green Hydrogen at Reliance Industries.

Noting that the next ten years will see a big transformation for all B school students or new generation business leaders, Maheshwari said “This is a great opportunity to learn and experience new business models”.

The theme of the two-day meeting which began on Saturday is “Business in the New Reality”. The conclave aims to understand the responsibilities and opportunities in the post-Covid scenario.

IIM Sambalpur Director Mahadeo Jaiswal said COVID-19 had paved the way for “new realities”.

“Data analytics, machine learning, artificial intelligence and blockchain are changing the landscape of traditional practices that the industry has followed all these years,” Jaiswal said.

Keynote speaker Pradeep Panigrahi, head of corporate sustainability at Larsen and Toubro, said thorough monitoring of carbon dioxide emissions must be undertaken by all companies to stay in business.

Stressing that the “decarbonization” of the investment landscape was the key to the future of humanity, Panigrahi said: “We must realize this situation and act on the ground”.

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Australian Prime Minister Morrison, Telecom News, ET Telecom https://westielovers.com/australian-prime-minister-morrison-telecom-news-et-telecom/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 09:54:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/australian-prime-minister-morrison-telecom-news-et-telecom/ Sydney: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Wednesday that there was a lot to do with India in the field of technology, adding that the two countries were already cooperating on cybersecurity, critical and emerging technologies, critical minerals and the digital economy. Speaking at the Sydney Dialogue to “Deepen Technology Partnership Among Quad Countries,” […]]]>
Sydney: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Wednesday that there was a lot to do with India in the field of technology, adding that the two countries were already cooperating on cybersecurity, critical and emerging technologies, critical minerals and the digital economy.

Speaking at the Sydney Dialogue to “Deepen Technology Partnership Among Quad Countries,” Scott Morrison informed that he will speak at the Bengaluru Tech Summit, India’s largest tech summit today and develop some complementary initiatives with India.

“We can do a lot with India in this area – which I have already spoken about today, including as part of our Quad partnership,” he said at the first Sydney Dialogue on Emerging Technologies. , reviews and cybernetics.

“As part of our comprehensive strategic partnership with India, our two countries are already cooperating – on cybersecurity, critical and emerging technologies, critical minerals, the digital economy and much more.”

He added: “I am also speaking at the Bengaluru Tech Summit today, which is India’s largest tech summit. I will develop some of the complementary initiatives with India at the summit.”

Speaking further on Quad, Morrison said Australia will also deepen its technology partnerships through Quad.

“Together with India, Japan and the United States, Australia is working to harness the capacities of our respective countries to improve the resilience of Indo-Pacific supply chains and foster an open technology ecosystem,” accessible and secure, ”he said.

“At the first in-person Quad leaders meeting in September in Washington DC, we agreed to strengthen the lines of effort in a number of very important areas, including technical standards, 5G deployment and diversification, and detailed horizon analysis and mapping, immediately focusing on supply chain security for semiconductors and their vital components, as well as exploring opportunities for cooperation on advanced biotechnologies “, he added.

He finally sent his best wishes to those including Prime Minister Narendra Modi for his participation in the Sydney Dialogue, organized by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI). Prime Minister Modi is expected to deliver a keynote address describing India’s technological evolution and revolution, during the inaugural dialogue in Sydney on November 18.

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Canadians Under 40 See Baby Boomer Legacy As Negative https://westielovers.com/canadians-under-40-see-baby-boomer-legacy-as-negative/ https://westielovers.com/canadians-under-40-see-baby-boomer-legacy-as-negative/#respond Fri, 12 Nov 2021 03:49:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/canadians-under-40-see-baby-boomer-legacy-as-negative/ TORONTO – A new Angus Reid Institute poll released Wednesday shows the great differences in beliefs between generations in Canada. The survey, which analyzed respondents’ engagement and advocacy for their personal positions and perspectives, dividing them into cohorts of “leaders” and “others” by age, presented several scenarios and questions to better understand the challenges facing […]]]>

TORONTO – A new Angus Reid Institute poll released Wednesday shows the great differences in beliefs between generations in Canada.

The survey, which analyzed respondents’ engagement and advocacy for their personal positions and perspectives, dividing them into cohorts of “leaders” and “others” by age, presented several scenarios and questions to better understand the challenges facing the community. Canada is facing and how they are viewed. by different generations.

The survey asked respondents to self-report whether they saw themselves as leaders in their communities and rated themselves on their ability to effect change. Some of the ways that engagement and advocacy was measured were by asking whether respondents had contacted government officials, volunteered, or attended protests.

The age categories were broken down into respondents aged 18 to 29, 30 to 40, 41 to 54, 55 to 64, and 65 and over.

WHAT IS THE POSITION OF THE COHORTES ON CANADA’S ISSUES?

Angus Reid reported that many young Canadian leaders prefer the idea of ​​starting from scratch rather than building on the foundations made by previous generations, with 47 percent of respondents aged 18 to 29 and 40 percent of older respondents. 30 to 40 years old believing that the future development of Canadian society requires starting over and restructuring the country differently.

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a huge increase in government spending and inflation, which is of concern to older and non-ruling Canadians. Young Canadians who are leaders are more concerned about economic inequalities and housing prices, according to the poll.

While climate change was the main concern across all age cohorts surveyed, a generational gap is observed when the poll broke down questions about values ​​and tradeoffs when it comes to dealing with the climate crisis.

For example, 80% of executives aged 18 to 29 believe that protecting the environment should take precedence over economic growth, compared to 58% of executives aged 41 to 54 and 67% of executives aged 65 and over .

Angus Reid notes that Canadians’ attention to issues affecting Indigenous communities increased over the summer after the graves of 215 children were rediscovered in May at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia, but has since declined.

When asked about the importance to them of reconciliation between Indigenous communities and Canadians, respondents again showed a gap by age, but more among “others” than leaders.

Fifty percent of young leaders, aged 18 to 29, said reconciliation was very important to them, compared to 40 percent of “others” in this age cohort.

Sixty percent of leaders aged 30 to 40 said reconciliation is very important, compared to 38 percent of others in the same group.

Forty-seven percent of leaders aged 65 and over said reconciliation was very important to them.

Executives, especially those 40 and under, are also much more likely to believe that whites enjoy societal advantages that visible minorities do not have, according to the survey, with 76% of those aged 18 to 29 and 78 % of 30 to 40 year olds. one-year leaders say so.

Generational differences were also explored in the poll, with Angus Reid explaining that the “cohort effect” is the idea that generations may have distinct perspectives shaped by specific events or unique historical circumstances that they have experienced.

Angus Reid said this can also be seen in the way generations view themselves, such as millennials describing themselves as the “luckiest” generation, coming of age with lower wages and rising house prices. arrow. The COVID-19 pandemic represents the second major economic stop in their careers after the 2008 recession, the institute said.

Over 40 percent of respondents under 41 consider their generation to have been unlucky, while the vast majority of older Canadians say their generation was lucky, as reported by more than nine in ten respondents aged 65 and over.

Real estate ownership was another issue that showed a clear division, with those over 41 saying it was one of three areas in which they had been particularly lucky, while 82 to 88% of people over 40 said they were particularly lucky. and under say their generation is unlucky. when it comes to the prospect of owning a home or property.

The way the baby boomers inheritance also differed greatly from one age cohort to another.

Respondents aged 55 to 64 and 65 and over, overwhelmingly, at 75 to 87 percent, rated the baby boomer inheritance as positive, compared to those aged 40 and under where a majority l ‘rated it as negative, and about 25 percent rated it as very negative.

Angus Reid reported that perceptions shifted when respondents were asked how they expect millennials to leave things better or worse than baby boomers.

For this question, 60 percent of leaders aged 18 to 29 and 56 percent of leaders aged 30 to 40 said millennials would leave things better than baby boomers, but only 20 percent of senior leaders 65 and over think the same.

When asked about their emotional attachment to Canada, there is once again a generational gap.

The majority of respondents aged 41 and over said they have a strong emotional attachment to Canada, love the country and what it represents.

However, younger generations see their relationship to the country differently, with 57 to 58 percent of 18 to 29 year olds and 46 to 48 percent of 30 to 40 year olds who see Canada as a place where they live but are not there. would not oppose. to seize opportunities elsewhere.

Young people surveyed are also more open to what Angus Reid has called “deeper cultural pluralism,” with the majority of respondents aged 18-29 (both leaders and others) saying that cultural diversity should to be encouraged, with different groups keeping their own customs and languages. .

As cohorts age, they are more likely to believe that minorities should do more to integrate into mainstream society, with 52% of leaders and 61% of others aged 65 and over saying so. .

However, there are some things that tie generations together, both of which are global beliefs about society, according to the poll.

A majority of those surveyed, 66 to 77 percent, believe in working for the common good, and 86 to 96 percent strongly believe that people can make a difference.

METHODOLOGY

The Angus Reid Institute conducted an online survey from July 26 to August 2, 2021 with a representative random sample of 4,094 Canadian adults who are Angus Reid Forum members. For comparison purposes only, a probability sample of this size would have a margin of error of +/- 1.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Discrepancies in or between totals are due to rounding. The survey was sponsored and paid for by ARI. This included an augmented survey sample of those who identified themselves as “leaders” in several screening surveys.

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Iranian foreign minister tests positive for COVID-19 at key moment in nuclear talks https://westielovers.com/iranian-foreign-minister-tests-positive-for-covid-19-at-key-moment-in-nuclear-talks/ https://westielovers.com/iranian-foreign-minister-tests-positive-for-covid-19-at-key-moment-in-nuclear-talks/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 06:32:44 +0000 https://westielovers.com/iranian-foreign-minister-tests-positive-for-covid-19-at-key-moment-in-nuclear-talks/ LONDON / BEIRUT: When Lebanese Prime Minister Najib Mikati formed a government in September, ending a 13-month political stalemate, a collective sigh of relief was heard across the country. But the writing was already on the wall. It didn’t take long for the moment of truth to arrive. Yet it was not the economic crisis, […]]]>

LONDON / BEIRUT: When Lebanese Prime Minister Najib Mikati formed a government in September, ending a 13-month political stalemate, a collective sigh of relief was heard across the country. But the writing was already on the wall.

It didn’t take long for the moment of truth to arrive. Yet it was not the economic crisis, the electricity crisis, the deadlock in the investigation into the Beirut explosion or the ongoing humanitarian catastrophe in the country that exposed the government’s powerlessness. Mikati, it was something completely different.

It was discovered that a TV star turned Minister of Information harbored scandalous views on an issue that had only peripheral relevance to Lebanon’s problems, but which had the potential to precipitate a serious diplomatic crisis for the country.

The Lebanese people know only too well that the government’s merry-go-round hides the reality of Hezbollah’s role as a puppeteer. (AFP)

In a recently revealed interview, George Kordahi claimed that the Iranian-backed Houthi militia in Yemen were defending themselves and the war in Yemen should end.

Although the interview was taped before he took up his cabinet post, Kordahi’s views came as a stark shock to Gulf friends and Arabs in Lebanon, who were the target of yet another nefarious campaign. originally from Lebanon.

Over the past six years, there have been continual attempts to smuggle arms from Lebanon to the Houthis and drug pills, primarily Captagon, from Lebanon to Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries.

As Waleed Bukhari, Saudi Arabia’s Ambassador to Lebanon, said in a tweet this year: “The amount of drugs and mind-altering drugs smuggled from Lebanon is enough to drown not only Saudi Arabia, but also the whole of the Arab world.

In this context, Lebanese leaders are naturally facing pressure to remove Kordahi from his post, a first step towards improving relations with the Gulf countries.

Lebanese officials have also urged their US and French counterparts to mediate the dispute over Kordahi’s comments. The Foreign Ministry said on Sunday that “Lebanon’s main concern (is) to have the best relations with its Gulf and Arab brothers”.

Many Lebanese believe that any other leader would have sent Kordahi to pack his bags and accuse Mikati of failing to show strong leadership as the minister’s views contradict Lebanon’s official position on the conflict in Yemen. (AFP)

But everything suggests that the situation will get worse before it gets better.

Kordahi said he had no plans to quit his post. In a televised speech on Sunday, he said bluntly: “Resigning from the government is not an option.”

Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Bahrain recalled their ambassadors from Beirut and ordered their respective Lebanese ambassadors to leave. The UAE has banned its citizens from traveling to Lebanon.

Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan has made it clear that Kordahi’s statements are a symptom of the root of the problems plaguing Lebanon: the influence of Hezbollah, which has de facto ruled Lebanon for a very long time.

Seasoned observers of Lebanese politics see Kordahi as irrelevant at best. They point out that he has a habit of reading someone else’s script: first from a teleprompter as the host of the Arabic version of the quiz show “Who wants to win millions? And now scripts handed to him by Hezbollah, as described by Arab News Editor-in-Chief Faisal J. Abbas in a recent column.

What has been a rude wake-up call for Lebanon’s friends and sympathizers is not so much Kordahi’s ill-informed views on the war in Yemen, as the weak response from the Mikati government.

“Compared to the average Lebanese prime minister, Mikati is less confrontational and more consensus-oriented,” Chris Abi-Nassif, director of the Lebanese program at the Middle East Institute, told Arab News. “Last week’s diplomatic escalation took him by surprise, especially as he was banking on his relatively good relations with the Gulf to begin to reverse Lebanon’s downward trajectory.

The escalation, however, shows that he clearly has very little room for maneuver and political capital today to stand up against Hezbollah or appease (let alone engage) the Gulf states, which explains the ‘indecision in Beirut in recent days. “

Kordahi said he had no plans to quit his post. (AFP)

Mikati, who is currently in Glasgow, Scotland, for COP26, the United Nations Climate Change Conference, was due to hold “several international and Arab meetings on Monday and Tuesday to discuss the current crisis between Lebanon and the countries of the Gulf “on the sidelines of the event. .

The precise conciliation measures he envisages are far from clear, even though Fawzi Kabbara, the Lebanese ambassador to Saudi Arabia, said on his return to Beirut that “the reestablishment of Lebanese-Saudi relations would be possible if the Lebanon accepts the conditions “.

Many Lebanese believe that any other leader would have sent Kordahi to pack his bags and accuse Mikati of failing to show strong leadership as the minister’s views contradict Lebanon’s official position on the conflict in Yemen.

They add that it is clear from the controversy that Kordahi’s protectors are Hezbollah and his ally, movement leader Marada Suleiman Frangieh, who have ostensibly congratulated him and made sure he stays in his post.

Mustafa Alloush, vice president of the Future Movement and former MP, said the situation would have been different if Kordahi had resigned quickly.

“Whether Kordahi resigns now or not is no longer relevant,” he told Arab News. “The Lebanese government has become a hostage and the proof is that the positions of Mikati and the Lebanese Foreign Ministry were neither decisive nor firm. Mikati had to be firm and order the impeachment of Kordahi and threaten to dissolve the government.

George Kordahi claimed that the Iranian-backed Houthi militia in Yemen were defending themselves and the war in Yemen should end. (AFP)

“But now I’m sure that damaging Lebanon’s relations with Saudi Arabia was intentional. Hezbollah continues its project by stoking hostility with the Arab states.

“The whole affair is linked to a long history of anti-Saudi statements and positions by Kordahi, former minister Charbel Wehbe and deputy Gebran Bassil, as well as the failure to address the issue of smuggling of Captagon from Lebanon to the Kingdom, and in pursuit of Hezbollah. insults and threats against Saudi Arabia.

Hezbollah has not been officially accused of being behind the upsurge in drug trafficking operations, but most of the fingers are pointing in its direction. According to a report by the Euro-Gulf Information Center: “The sale of drugs represents an important source of income for Hezbollah, made more important by the American sanctions against key members of the party and its main financial sponsor, Iran. . The collapse of the Lebanese state has also pushed Hezbollah deeper into the illicit drug trade – there is less to steal from the national economy. “

The accusations are hardly surprising given that Lebanon has long operated under the thumb of Hezbollah. The Lebanese people know only too well that the government’s merry-go-round hides the reality of Hezbollah’s role as a puppeteer. The Prime Minister takes advantage of the visible trappings of power, but it is ultimately Hezbollah that pulls the strings.

Hezbollah has not been officially accused of being behind the upsurge in drug trafficking operations, but most of the fingers are pointing in its direction. (SPA)

“Mikati is not the ideal candidate to do the heavy lifting in Beirut, neither with regard to the reforms required, nor with regard to the major political crises facing Lebanon,” said Bashar Halabi, an analyst. Lebanese politician, to Arab News.

“At best, Mikati is a compromise candidate who fills a gap when (former Prime Minister Saad) Hariri is not in power. He does not appreciate the great popularity or the courage of confrontations. Therefore, he is a “filler” of sorts. And with all these files blasting in her face, Mikati is also distraught and helpless.

Halabi added: “Today Hezbollah controls the country. It controls the executive, it controls the legislature, it controls the presidency, and it has great hold over the judiciary and the media.

“With Lebanon falling almost entirely under the influence of Iran, as the country becomes a satellite state of the Tehran regime and of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, the peculiarity of Lebanon and what it represented for the countries of the Gulf has shrunk, whether as a geopolitical asset. , the banking sector, the health sector or a space with a lot of margin for the press.

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Sanjaya Baru | Modi’s macroeconomics: a confusing lack of clarity https://westielovers.com/sanjaya-baru-modis-macroeconomics-a-confusing-lack-of-clarity/ https://westielovers.com/sanjaya-baru-modis-macroeconomics-a-confusing-lack-of-clarity/#respond Sun, 31 Oct 2021 20:15:00 +0000 https://westielovers.com/sanjaya-baru-modis-macroeconomics-a-confusing-lack-of-clarity/ The reconstitution of the Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory Council, with a prominent economist, Rakesh Mohan, replacing another eminent economist, Anantha Nageswaran, should not be interpreted as anything other than a routine bureaucratic decision. The incumbent’s term was over and someone had to fill the position. Few people really expect this change in composition to make […]]]>

The reconstitution of the Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory Council, with a prominent economist, Rakesh Mohan, replacing another eminent economist, Anantha Nageswaran, should not be interpreted as anything other than a routine bureaucratic decision. The incumbent’s term was over and someone had to fill the position.

Few people really expect this change in composition to make a difference in thinking and action on the economic policy front at the highest levels of decision-making, given Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s track record. He has shown little interest in macroeconomics and at prime ministerial level it is the big picture that matters, not the details of sector policy that line ministries should normally focus on.

Likewise, the decision of the Chief Economic Adviser, Krishnamurthy Subramanian, to resume his academic duties, with his term ending just two months before the presentation of the Union budget and the economic study to Parliament, was also discussed. routinely. The position will be filled by December, and the transition is unlikely to make much of a difference in the writing of the Economic Survey. With the minimum qualification for the post diluted, no longer a doctorate but only a master’s degree in economics, the current second in command, Sanjeev Sanyal, can easily step into the post and finish writing the survey. Mr Sanyal, a Rhodes Scholar, is talented and is known to have the ear of the Prime Minister, being a staunch loyalist of Narendra Modi.

The reconstitution of any advisory council to the head of government in any modern economy is still the subject of numerous analyzes and interpretations. Analysts look to political indicators, the ideological predilections of those leaving and those entering to interpret likely influences on the head of government.

In India, too, there was a time when government observers scrutinized who was on the inside and who was on the outside when it came to economic policy making. During the years in power of Indira Gandhi and Rajiv Gandhi, the battle for political influence opposed “left” and “right” economists. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh had his own opinion on economic policy, but gave equal attention to the views of other talented economists like C. Rangarajan and Montek Singh Ahluwalia. After the UPA came to power in 2004, Dr Singh played a key role in economic policy formulation during the early years, but during his second term much of the political initiative slipped into the hands of then-finance minister Pranab Mukherjee.

Observers of economic policy in New Delhi have often wondered who among government economists Prime Minister Narendra Modi pays attention. The chairman of the Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory Council, Bibek Debroy, and Niti Aayog’s vice-chairman, Rajiv Kumar, must certainly have the prime minister’s ear and he should read all the notes they present to him, but it doesn’t is not clear. what impact their points of view and those of other members of PMEAC and Niti Aayog had on the thinking of the Prime Minister. Reading some of the published works of these notables, one wonders whether government policy makers have read them or not.

More recently, a gulf has arisen between the traditional Swadeshi economists of the BJP and the more market-oriented economists in foreign trade policy. Economists Surjit Bhalla and Rakesh Mohan, both advisers to the prime minister, have diverged over a range of political issues over the past two years, with the exception of privatization, and it remains to be seen which of them will have the upper hand. more influence over the prime minister.

As for the CEA of the Modi government, the less we say, the better. Neither Arvind Subramanian nor Krishnamurthy Subramanian had the kind of influence on the Prime Minister’s thinking on economic policy that some of their illustrious predecessors had. Dr Subramanian will likely be remembered more for his insistence that the recovery from Covid lockdown was V-shaped, ignoring its visible K-shape, than any other political idea.

Unsurprisingly, even within the Ministry of Finance, the CEA has been reduced to the status of head of research rather than head of policy. It is often forgotten these days that the CEA is not only an official of the Ministry of Finance but is in fact the main economic adviser to the government of the Union. Some of the former incumbents have had a profound influence on politics as they have managed to get the attention of no less than the head of government.

The political mandate of the CEA was not only broader in the past, but the Annual Economic Survey, which is produced under the responsibility of the CEA, was generally regarded as the official economic policy statement and document of the government. Over the past decade, starting with Dr Kaushik Basu and continuing with his successors, the Economic Survey has grown into a semi-academic publication, as have many think tank papers.

The two finance ministers, Arun Jaitley and Nirmala Sitharaman, distanced themselves from some of the Inquiry’s ideas, saying it was not from the ministry’s point of view but the authors of the publication. Beyond appearing in the mandatory media interviews before and after the budget, it is not clear what role today’s ACEs actually play in budgeting. Many distinguished ACEs have been called upon in the past to draft the Budget Speech for the Minister of Finance. It seems that is no longer the case. However, if Mr. Sanyal becomes the CEA, he may well end up writing the finance minister’s next speech.

The lack of clarity on the thinking of the Prime Minister and the Minister of Finance on macroeconomic policy has baffled investors time and time again. Reckless initiatives like demonetization, truncated ideas like issuing sovereign bonds on world markets, a confused policy of tax on goods and services, etc. give the impression that the economic policy of Narendra Modi’s government is shaped by trial and error rather than a medium to long term strategy.

Mr. Modi’s policy of trial and error and hit and run on the economic front has meant that the most informed opinion on the economy, including that of those who advise the government at various levels , is that economic growth will remain subdued until his second term, and his ten-year average will remain well below that recorded during Dr Manmohan Singh’s decade in power.

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Climate change could devastate world’s biggest economic powers, report warns https://westielovers.com/climate-change-could-devastate-worlds-biggest-economic-powers-report-warns/ https://westielovers.com/climate-change-could-devastate-worlds-biggest-economic-powers-report-warns/#respond Thu, 28 Oct 2021 16:50:09 +0000 https://westielovers.com/climate-change-could-devastate-worlds-biggest-economic-powers-report-warns/ Emissions Carbon dioxide Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the main contributors to global warming. Once the gas is released into the atmosphere, it stays there, making it difficult for heat to escape – and warming the planet in the process. It comes mainly from the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil and […]]]>

Emissions

Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the main contributors to global warming. Once the gas is released into the atmosphere, it stays there, making it difficult for heat to escape – and warming the planet in the process.

It comes mainly from the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas, as well as from the production of cement.

The average monthly CO2 concentration in the Earth’s atmosphere as of April 2019 is 413 parts per million (ppm). Before the Industrial Revolution, the concentration was only 280 ppm.

The concentration of CO2 has fluctuated over the past 800,000 years between 180 and 280 ppm, but has been greatly accelerated by human-caused pollution.

Nitrogen dioxide

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas comes from the combustion of fossil fuels, car exhaust emissions and the use of nitrogen-based fertilizers used in agriculture.

Although there is much less NO2 in the atmosphere than CO2, it is between 200 and 300 times more efficient at trapping heat.

Sulfur dioxide

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) also comes mainly from the combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be released from car exhaust fumes.

SO2 can react with water, oxygen and other chemicals in the atmosphere to cause acid rain.

Carbon monoxide

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an indirect greenhouse gas because it reacts with hydroxyl radicals, eliminating them. Hydroxyl radicals reduce the lifespan of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.

Particles

What is particulate matter?

Particles refer to tiny parts of solids or liquids in the air.

Some are visible, such as dust, while others are not visible to the naked eye.

Materials such as metals, microplastics, soil, and chemicals can be particles.

Particles (or PM) are described in micrometers. The two main ones mentioned in reports and studies are PM10 (less than 10 micrometers) and PM2.5 (less than 2.5 micrometers).

Air pollution comes from burning fossil fuels, cars, cement manufacturing and agriculture

Scientists measure the rate of particles in the air per cubic meter.

Particles are released into the air by a number of processes, including burning fossil fuels, driving cars, and making steel.

Why are particles dangerous?

Particles are dangerous because particles less than 10 microns in diameter can penetrate deep into your lungs and even pass into your bloodstream. Particulate matter is found in higher concentrations in urban areas, especially along major roads.

Health impact

What kinds of health problems can pollution cause?

According to the World Health Organization, a third of deaths from stroke, lung cancer and heart disease can be linked to air pollution.

Some of the effects of air pollution on the body are not understood, but pollution can increase inflammation that constricts arteries, leading to heart attacks or strokes.

On top of that, nearly one in 10 lung cancer cases in the UK is caused by air pollution.

The particles enter and lodge in the lungs, causing inflammation and damage. In addition to this, certain chemicals in the particles that enter the body can cause cancer.

Pollution deaths

About seven million people die prematurely each year from air pollution. Pollution can cause a number of problems, including asthma attacks, strokes, various cancers, and cardiovascular issues.

asthma triggers

Air pollution can cause problems for asthmatics for a number of reasons. The pollutants in traffic fumes can irritate your airways, and the particles can enter your lungs and throat and cause these areas to become inflamed.

Problems during pregnancy

Women exposed to air pollution before becoming pregnant are nearly 20% more likely to have babies with birth defects, according to a January 2018 study.

Living within 3 miles of a heavily polluted area one month before conception makes women more likely to give birth to babies with defects such as cleft palates or lips, according to a study from the University of Cincinnati.

For every 0.01 mg / m3 increase in fine air particles, birth defects increase by 19%, the research adds.

Previous research suggests that this causes birth defects due to women suffering from inflammation and “internal stress.”

What are we doing to fight air pollution?

Paris Agreement on Climate Change

The Paris Agreement, which was first signed in 2015, is an international agreement aimed at controlling and limiting climate change.

He hopes to keep the increase in global average temperature below 2 ° C (3.6 ° F) “and continue his efforts to limit the increase in temperature to 1.5 ° C (2.7 ° F) “.

Carbon neutral by 2050

The UK government has announced plans to make the country carbon neutral by 2050.

They plan to do this by planting more trees and installing “carbon capture” technology at the source of the pollution.

Some critics fear that this first option will be used by the government to export its carbon offset to other countries.

International carbon credits allow nations to continue to emit carbon while paying for trees to be planted elsewhere, thus balancing their emissions.

No new petrol or diesel vehicles by 2040

In 2017, the UK government announced that the sale of new petrol and diesel cars would be banned by 2040.

However, climate change committee members urged the government to postpone the ban until 2030, because by then they will have an equivalent range and price.

The Paris Agreement, which was first signed in 2015, is an international agreement aimed at controlling and limiting climate change.  Pictured: Air pollution over Paris in 2019.

The Paris Agreement, which was first signed in 2015, is an international agreement aimed at controlling and limiting climate change. Pictured: Air pollution over Paris in 2019.

Norwegian subsidies for electric cars

The rapid electrification of the Norwegian vehicle fleet is mainly due to generous state subsidies. Electric cars are almost entirely exempt from the heavy taxes imposed on gasoline and diesel cars, making them competitively priced.

A VW Golf with a standard combustion engine costs almost 334,000 crowns (34,500 euros, $ 38,600), while its electric cousin the e-Golf costs 326,000 crowns thanks to a lower tax quotient.

Criticism of inaction on climate change

The Climate Change Committee (CCC) said there was a “shocking” lack of preparedness by the government for the risks to the country from climate change.

The committee assessed 33 areas where climate change risks needed to be addressed – from the resilience of properties to flooding to impacts on farmlands and supply chains – and found no real progress in any of them. them.

The UK is unprepared for a 2 ° C warming, the level at which countries have pledged to curb rising temperatures, let alone a 4 ° C rise, which is possible if gases greenhouse gases are not being reduced globally, the committee said.

He added that cities need more green space to stop the urban “heat island” effect and to prevent flooding by absorbing heavy rains.

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